Dirty Little Secrets: Contamination Costs and Clusters

3 years ago
  • Html
  • Text

If you're having trouble, view as a web page.

 
 

December 9, 2015



DIRTY LITTLE SECRETS: CONTAMINATION COSTS AND CLUSTERS
Do you live near a contaminated site? Chances are you do. Sarah Gonzalez and the WNYC Data Team did some digging and found that about 90% of New Jersey residents live within 1 mile of a contaminated site. Moreover, their investigation found that 1,464 of the state's 14,066 known contaminated sites don't have a clean-up plan in place. Many sites have sat unattended for years, and they are disproportionately located in low-income communities. Use WNYC's map tool to find a contaminated site near you.
What about the people who don't just live near a contaminated site, but live on top of one? NJTV says the clean-up costs to remediate something like a leaking underground oil or gas storage tank can easily bankrupt the average family, placing them on the hook for hundreds of thousands of dollars. Meanwhile, the Department of Environmental Projection is rarely on site to ensure the clean-up process meets state environmental standards. 
These stories are part of a collaborative effort called "Dirty Little Secrets," a series investigating New Jersey's toxic legacy. Participating news partners include New Jersey Public Radio/WNYCWHYYNJTVNJ SpotlightJersey Shore Hurricane NewsWBGONew Brunswick Today, and the Rutgers Department of Journalism and Media Studies. The collaboration is facilitated by The Center for Investigative Reporting, with help from the Center for Cooperative Media. The project is made possible with support from the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation.

Stay tuned for more stories from this series all week – and in the coming weeks. You can join the conversation on social media by using the hashtag #ToxicNJ.
  • • • • • 
THE CHRISTIE TRACKER: CHRIS CHRISTIE'S NEW SUITOR AND THE 'CRAZY EX-GIRLFRIEND' DEBATE
On this week's episode of WNYC's Christie Tracker Podcast, David Furst manages to get the Star-Ledger's Tom Moran in the same room with Grant Bosse, Editorial Page Editor of New Hampshire's Union Leader, over the paper's recent endorsement of Christie. Moran says the Leader didn't do its homework, and Bosse likened the Star-Ledger to Christie's "crazy ex-girlfriend." 
AGREEMENT MAY BE NEAR ON GAS TAX PLAN
An agreement could be near to increase the state gas tax for the first time since 1988. WBGO says Senate Budget Committee chairman Paul Sarlo believes he has enough support in Trenton to raise the gas tax, phase out the estate tax, and increase the exemption cap on retirement income. Sarlo says he's willing to put the package on the table – all he needs now is a signal from the governor that he's willing to sign it.
FOLLOWING ORDERS, OVERWEIGHT NATIONAL GUARD GENERAL SLIMMING DOWN
The commander of the New Jersey Air and Army National Guard is making progress after he was given three months to drop some weight in order to meet the military's physical-fitness standards. NJ.com says Governor Christie ordered Brig. General Michael Cuniff to lose weight after learning that the Pentagon had reprimanded him for being overweight and ducking physical-fitness tests.
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: We've extended the deadline for submissions to our statewide undergraduate reporting contest, which boasts a grand price of $650. We will now be accepting submissions until April 1, 2016. The best submissions will be included and published as part of our Dirty Little Secrets project with the Center for Investigative Reporting.
Want more? Check out our must-reads here.

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY - NJ NEWS COMMONS

Subscribe | Unsubscribe | Forward to a Friend

     

Share this newsletter on

Related newsletters

© 2019