Dirty Little Secrets: The Hidden Liabilities of Hidden Oil Tanks

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December 10, 2015



THE HIDDEN LIABILITIES OF HIDDEN OIL TANKS
We start with part two of NJTV's three-part series on the issue of oil and gasoline contamination from underground storage tanks and the devastating impact they can have on homeowners and the environment. Thousands of properties – some still with tanks in the ground, some abandoned – can be found all across New Jersey. Cleanup is slow and expensive, and a lack of oversight by the state Department of Environmental Protection breeds additional problems.
This story is part of a collaborative effort called "Dirty Little Secrets," a series investigating New Jersey's toxic legacy. Participating news partners include New Jersey Public Radio/WNYCWHYYNJTVNJ SpotlightJersey Shore Hurricane NewsWBGONew Brunswick Today, and the Rutgers Department of Journalism and Media Studies. The collaboration is facilitated by The Center for Investigative Reporting, with help from the Center for Cooperative Media. The project is made possible with support from the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation.

Stay tuned for more stories from this series all week – and in the coming weeks. You can join the conversation on social media by using the hashtag #ToxicNJ.   • • • • •
  EPA PROVIDES $368,000 GRANT TO STUDY MEADOWLANDS
Scientists studying the Meadowlands will receive a $368,000 grant from the EPA to study how the famed wetlands can naturally store carbon dioxide to help fight global warming. The Record says the grant to the State Meadowlands Environmental Research Institute focuses on measuring the long-term effectiveness of Meadowlands plants storing carbon dioxide from the air.
SWEENEY SEEKS CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT TO FUND STATE PENSIONS
Senate President Stephen Sweeney is reigniting a debate over the state's biggest fiscal challenge: the grossly underfunded public-employee pension system. NJ Spotlight says Sweeney introduced a resolution on Monday that asks voters to amend New Jersey's constitution to prohibit the state from skipping out on the full amount it should be putting aside for employee retirements each year.
SHOULD THE LEGAL AGE TO BUY CIGARETTES IN NJ BE RAISED TO 21?
With more than 8 million packs of cigarettes sold each year in New Jersey to young adults ages 19-20, public health advocates are urging members of the state Assembly Health and Senior Services Committee to approve a bill that would raise the legal age to buy cigarettes in New Jersey from 19 to 21 years old. NJ.com says the legislation would also eliminate $19 million in tax revenues for the state in the first year, and opponents say it would do little to keep anyone from smoking. 
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: We've extended the deadline for submissions to our statewide undergraduate reporting contest, which boasts a grand price of $650. We will now be accepting submissions until April 1, 2016. The best submissions will be included and published as part of our Dirty Little Secrets project with the Center for Investigative Reporting.
Want more? Check out our must-reads here.

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY - NJ NEWS COMMONS

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