March & April: dresses and #rhodesmustfall

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First Thing with John Stupart

Wednesday, 23rd December


"What will shape South Africa’s political destiny is not 'the truth' but the careful navigation and
understanding of how words are digested by those watching and listening"
- Siya Khumalo


Nic Harry socks. Click here for details.

What you read: March & April 2015


‘The Rhodes statue must fall’: UCT’s radical rebirth
he controversial actions of a UCT student to protest the continued display of a statue of Cecil John Rhodes through dousing it in human waste evoked an outpouring of support from fellow students. Their collective response reveals
much about opposition, resistance and transformation in the South African academy. By REBECCA HODES
The death of Ntuli-Zuma’s bodyguard: So many questions, after all these years
odyguard Phinda Thomo was found dead in an apparent suicide in his Soweto home five yearsago. Yet there has been no closure for his family, who do not believe this father of four took his own life. Their anguish was compounded by
unverified claims made after his death that he killed himself because he had been having an affair with First Lady Nompumelelo Ntuli-Zuma when he was her private bodyguard. To add to the ongoing mystery, Daily Maverick
has now established that there was a quiet public inquest into Thomo's death, which revealed some startling contradictions in the evidence. By GLYNNIS UNDERHILL
Je
suis kwerekwere: Letter from a Sacred Heart student

Below you will find a letter written by one of the 11-year olds at the Sacred Heart primary school. We have changed names to protect identities and I encourage you to share theletter with all your contacts. She
arrived at her teacher’s classroom this morning and said, “Please will you help me get this out to as many people as possible”. Letter written by DANAI PACHEDU.
Analysis: The dress that brought the Mpumalanga legislature to a standstill
‘Does this dress make me look unparliamentary?’ On Tuesday the business of the Mpumalanga legislatureground to a halt while MPs argued whether
this dress made DA Mpumalanga deputy leader Jane Moloisi-Sithole look too provocative. This is not some sort of belated April Fool’s joke. By REBECCA DAVIS.
Nic Harry socks. Click here for details.
Now on Daily Maverick
SA vs England Test series preview: Five key battles
The much anticipated four-match Test series between South Africa and England kicks off in Durban on Boxing Day. On paper, it promises to be a
tight affair, but South Africa have a few questions they need to answer before they get going. ANTOINETTE MULLER picks five key battles that lie ahead.
FIFA ethics committee unlikely to stop at Blatter &
Platini

Largely anonymous, lacking police powers and with its independence sometimes questioned, FIFA's ethics committee has often struggled to be taken
seriously in the fight against corruption in soccer's world body. By Reuters.
Irvin Jim: A small and insignificant march – a false step for the working
class!

It is not by accident that the black and African working class largely boycotted these marches, which the organisers and their largely white
middle class choir simply put down to their lack of education and ignorance but a conscious political understanding.
Ivo Vegter: Sugar: Don’t be a Grinch this festive
season

Go to any children’s party, and you’ll hear that the kids are bouncing off the walls because they get to pig out on sugar, and sugar is toxic.
Some parents will even forbid their children from partaking in the sugary treats.
In Case You Missed It
Frail but unapologetic, Blatter vows "I'll be back"
He was introduced as "the elected president of FIFA" but the Sepp Blatter who sat in front of reporters on Monday, shortly after receiving an
eight-year ban from soccer, appeared very different to the confident man who had led the sport's global governing body for 17 years. By Simon Evans for Reuters.
Burkina Fasso issues warrant for ex-leader Compaore over Sankara
murder

Burkina Faso has issued an international arrest warrant for ousted leader Blaise Compaore in connection with the murder of former president Thomas
Sankara nearly 30 years ago, judicial sources said on Monday. By Nadoun Coulibaly and Mathieu Bonkougou for Reuters.
Moody's sees Brazil 'perfect storm', vows patience on South
Africa

Moody's is likely to follow Standard & Poor's and Fitch in cutting Brazil's credit rating to non-investment grade, its top sovereign analyst
said in a Reuters interview, but the agency plans to take its time over a potential downgrade of South Africa. By Marc Jones for REUTERS.
FIFA: Blatter and Platini banned for eight years
FIFA President Sepp Blatter and UEFA boss Michel Platini were both banned from soccer for eight years on Monday for ethics violations, leaving the
global game leaderless as it fights a swirl of corruption cases. By Simon Evans for REUTERS.
Video: Evita's Free Speech - Episode 11
Leading up to the 2016 South African Municipal Elections and the 20th year celebration of her theatre in Darling, Evita se Perron, Tannie Evita
has committed herself to broadcasting a Sunday recap of the week's news, with the accent on Free Speech. Here's the Episode 11. By PIETER-DIRK UYS.
ICG: The unbearable urgency of resuming Turkey/PKK peace
talks

With a new government in place after the 1 November election, now is the time to reverse the spiral of mistrust between Ankara and the disparate
Kurdish movement, represented, at times interchangeably and without clear mandates, by the legal Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP), now in the parliament, as well as the outlawed PKK and its jailed leader, Abdullah Öcalan. By the INTERNATIONAL CRISIS
GROUP.
Op-Ed: South Africa's most powerful man
We are talking about Pravin Gordhan, of course. If President Zuma removed him now, the financial consequences would be so much worse than his last
prank that his political life would be over, which it already almost is. Gordhan knows all this, of course. He is also a patriot with integrity, and a strategist. These are the exact qualities our leaders need, those of which Zuma is so woefully
short. By JOHN MATISONN.
2015 Photo of the Year: President Jacob Zuma
As this year began, so shall it end. It started with mayhem in Parliament, and by July we were in the winter of discontent. Now as we careen
towards Christmas, we are in another season altogether, and it is ripe with chaos. By SISONKE MSIMANG.
ICG: Iran after the Nuclear Deal
Tensions within the Islamic Republic stem in no small part from its blend of popular sovereignty and religious authority. Theocratic forces seek
to maintain the dominance of the supreme leader and other tutelary bodies, while republican forces advocate more clout for popularly-elected institutions. Each camp is further split between pragmatists who seek incremental political evolution, and
radicals who either resist any change or promote revolutionary transformation. By the INTERNATIONAL CRISIS GROUP.
Five years since the famine, Somali children are still stalked by the menace of
hunger

Since the 2011 famine, malnutrition in Somalia has decreased, to some extent. Among children under five years old it has fallen from 18% in the
2011 Gu (the rainy season in Somalia, which is the primary cropping season and runs from April to June) to 13% in the 2015 Gu. However, the improvement has not been enough to lift hundreds of thousands of children out of the fear – and the reality –
of hunger. By KUN LI for UNICEF.
ICG: New risks on Nigeria’s Shiite fault line
On 12 and 13 December, Nigerian government troops clashed with members of the Islamic Movement of Nigeria (IMN). Their battle in the city of
Zaria, in north central Kaduna state, reportedly killed more than 100 people, including some senior movement members, and threatened wider violence. Crisis Group’s Senior Nigeria Analyst, NNAMDI OBASI, provides some insight into what happened, the
relationship of the Shiite group with the government and with Sunni radicals, and whether the Nigerian government risks a second Boko Haram-style insurgency. By the INTERNATIONAL CRISIS GROUP.
2015: Africa for pessimists
Despite all the progress – and there is a lot of that – there are still plenty of bad African news stories. SIMON ALLISON looks at what has gone
wrong in 2015.
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