ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine News

11 days ago


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ScienceDaily: Health & Medicine News


Gene-editing tool CRISPR repurposed to develop better antibiotics
Harnessing multiple data streams and artificial intelligence to better predict flu
Millions on prescription sleeping pills would sleep through a fire alarm
How missing doctor's appointments increases the risk of death
VISTA checkpoint implicated in pancreatic cancer immunotherapy resistance
Powerful microscope captures first image of nanoscaffold that promotes cell movement
Binge eating and smoking linked to bullying and sexual abuse
Being HIV positive and staying on antiretroviral therapy in Africa
Parasites from patients with cerebral malaria stick preferentially in their brains
Ultra-sturdy bones, with a surprising origin, suggest new osteoporosis approach
VAT fat may cause pathogenic obesity
Activated PMN exosomes are pathogenic entities that cause destruction in the COPD lung
New leukemia drug is more effective and easier to use


Gene-editing tool CRISPR repurposed to develop better antibiotics



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 04:25 PM PST


Scientists have repurposed the gene-editing tool CRISPR to study which genes are targeted by particular antibiotics, providing clues on how to improve existing antibiotics or develop new ones.


Harnessing multiple data streams and artificial intelligence to better predict flu



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 11:37 AM PST


Influenza is highly contagious and easily spreads as people move about and travel, making tracking and forecasting flu activity a challenge. While the CDC continuously monitors patient visits for flu-like illness in the US, this information can lag up to two weeks behind real time. A new study combines two forecasting methods with machine learning to estimate local flu activity.


Millions on prescription sleeping pills would sleep through a fire alarm



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 08:28 AM PST


Widely prescribed 'benzodiazepine' sleeping pills suppress the sleeping brain's ability to wake us when it senses a threat. But an alternative class of hypnotics currently under development could allow users to rouse in the event of an earthquake, fire alarm or intruder, according to a new study.


How missing doctor's appointments increases the risk of death



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 08:28 AM PST


Missing GP appointments is associated with early death, and those with long-term mental health conditions are at particular risk. In the largest study of its kind, the team examined over 500,000 patients' appointment histories in Scotland, tracked for three years between 2013 and 2016. Patients with mental-health conditions had an eight times greater risk of death and those with physical conditions a threefold increase in all cause mortality.


VISTA checkpoint implicated in pancreatic cancer immunotherapy resistance



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 08:28 AM PST


Researchers have identified a new potential immunotherapy target in pancreatic cancer, which so far has been notoriously resistant to treatment with immune checkpoint blockade drugs effective against a variety of other cancers.


Powerful microscope captures first image of nanoscaffold that promotes cell movement



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:51 AM PST


Using one of the most powerful microscopes in the world, scientists have identified a dense, dynamic and disorganized actin filament nanoscaffold -- resembling a haystack -- that is induced in response to a molecular signal. This is the first time researchers have directly visualized, at the molecular level, a structure that is triggered in response to a cellular signal -- a key finding that expands our understanding of how cells move.


Binge eating and smoking linked to bullying and sexual abuse



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:51 AM PST


People who ever suffered bullying or sexual abuse have a lower quality of life similar to those living with chronic conditions like heart disease, diabetes, depression or severe anxiety, a new study has found.


Being HIV positive and staying on antiretroviral therapy in Africa



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:51 AM PST


An international team of researchers have carried out a review of the evidence examining what influences people who are HIV positive to go to health services and then stay on antiretroviral drugs in Africa.


Parasites from patients with cerebral malaria stick preferentially in their brains



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:51 AM PST


Scientists have provided, for the first time, evidence which links the ability of red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite to bind to the cells lining the blood vessels of the brain, with the clinical syndrome cerebral malaria.


Ultra-sturdy bones, with a surprising origin, suggest new osteoporosis approach



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:09 AM PST


A handful of brain cells deep in the brain may play a surprising role in controlling women's bone density, according to new research. Researchers showed that blocking a particular set of signals from these cells causes female (but not male) mice to build extraordinarily strong bones and maintain them into old age, raising hopes for new approaches to preventing or treating osteoporosis in older women.


VAT fat may cause pathogenic obesity



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:09 AM PST


VAT, Visceral Adipose Tissue, a kind of fat that accumulates around the abdominal organs, has an important immune function. The body may choose to turn excess fat into FAT not SAT, subcutaneous fat when a fetus is not well nourished and is likely to face disease.


Activated PMN exosomes are pathogenic entities that cause destruction in the COPD lung



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:08 AM PST


Researchers have found a novel, pathogenic entity that is a fundamental link between chronic inflammation and tissue destruction in lungs of patients with COPD. These exosomes from activated neutrophils caused COPD damage when they were instilled into the lungs of healthy mice. Remarkably, neutrophil exosomes from the lung fluids of human patients with COPD and neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia also caused COPD lung damage when put into the lungs of healthy mice.


New leukemia drug is more effective and easier to use



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:08 AM PST


Oncologists have found that a newer targeted drug is significantly more effective than standard therapy for treating elderly patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The drug is taken as a pill once a day -- much more convenient than the standard treatment requiring the patient to come in three times a month for infusions and an injection.
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