ScienceDaily: Latest Science News

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ScienceDaily: Latest Science News


For anxiety, a single intervention is not enough
Handgun purchaser licensing laws linked to fewer firearm homicides in large, urban areas
Bigger human brain prioritizes thinking hub -- at a cost
New guidelines recommend earlier colorectal cancer screening
Hydropower in Cambodia could threaten food security of region
Drowsy worms offer new insights into the neuroscience of sleep
Combining experts and automation in 3D printing
An artificial nerve system gives prosthetic devices and robots a sense of touch
Symptoms worsen around menses for people with borderline personality disorder
Mother knows best -- how plants help offspring by passing on seasonal clues
Impact of dengue virus on Ethiopia
Biosecurity reduces invasions of plant pathogens over a national border
Bacteria ensure square meal for bloodsucking ticks
Two ancient populations that diverged later 'reconverged' in the Americas
Atherosclerosis: Stopped on time
Antifungal drug eliminates sleeping bowel cancer cells in mice
Scientists rethink co-evolution of marine life, oxygenated oceans
Abnormal lipid metabolism in fat cells predicts future weight gain and diabetes in women
Secrets behind Pluto's dunes revealed
Lego-like chemical building blocks self-assemble into catalyst for hydrogen fuel cells
Sintering solutions aboard the International Space Station
How Earth slows the solar wind to a gentle breeze
Cool weather can amplify attacks of tree-killing bark beetle
News flash about hot flashes: They can last longer than you think
New findings link estrogen and T cell immune response to autoimmune inflammation
'Why not take a risk' attitude widespread among patients and providers
Psychologists: Women are not to blame for the wage gap
From face recognition to phase recognition
Memory depends on protein 'off-switch'
Getting conservationists and fishers on the same page
Alternative inflation rate may offer more accurate economic guidance
Your brain is multitasking, using a hunger peptide that tells you when to eat
This is your brain detecting patterns
Sugarcane pest produces foam to protect itself from heat
Paving the way for safer, smaller batteries and fuel cells
AI researchers design 'privacy filter' for your photos
Ocean-migrating trout adapt to freshwater environment in 120 years
Oil and gas wastewater as dust suppressant less than ideal
Number of wild mountain gorillas exceeds 1,000
Goodbye 'stress granules': Study expands possibilities for treating neurological diseases
Scientists boost crop production by 47 percent by speeding up photorespiration
Social ties could preserve memory, slow brain aging
Drugs that suppress immune system may protect against Parkinson's
Less is more when it comes to predicting molecules' conductivity
Climate change increasing risks of lightning-ignited fires
Study estimates increased death rate in Puerto Rico in months after Hurricane Maria
Insufficient vitamin D linked to miscarriage among women with prior pregnancy loss
Ban e-cig flavors and misleading advertisements to protect youth, says global respiratory group


For anxiety, a single intervention is not enough



Posted: 31 May 2018 02:16 PM PDT


No matter which treatment they get, only 20 percent of young people diagnosed with anxiety will stay well, researchers report. The study followed 319 young people aged 10 to 25 who had been diagnosed with separation, social, or general anxiety disorders. They received evidence-based treatment, and then had follow-ups with the researchers every year for four years. This is the first study to reassess youth treated for anxiety every year for four years.


Handgun purchaser licensing laws linked to fewer firearm homicides in large, urban areas



Posted: 31 May 2018 02:16 PM PDT


State laws that require gun purchasers to obtain a license contingent on passing a background check performed by state or local law enforcement are associated with a 14 percent reduction in firearm homicides in large, urban counties.


Bigger human brain prioritizes thinking hub -- at a cost



Posted: 31 May 2018 02:16 PM PDT


Some human brains are nearly twice the size of others -- but how might that matter? Researcher have discovered that these differences in size are related to the brain's shape and the way it is organized. The bigger the brain, the more its additional area is accounted for by growth in thinking areas of the cortex, or outer mantle -- at the expense of relatively slower growth in lower emotional, sensory, and motor areas.


New guidelines recommend earlier colorectal cancer screening



Posted: 31 May 2018 01:23 PM PDT


New guidelines developed by the American Cancer Society recommend that screening for colorectal cancer for average-risk adults begin at age 45, five years earlier than the previous recommendation.


Hydropower in Cambodia could threaten food security of region



Posted: 31 May 2018 01:23 PM PDT


Farmers and anglers in Cambodia depend on the Mekong River's predictable seasonal patterns, but new dams for hydroelectricity are altering the hydrology of the river. These changes have the potential to threaten fish migration, livelihoods, and regional food security.


Drowsy worms offer new insights into the neuroscience of sleep



Posted: 31 May 2018 01:23 PM PDT


Scientists studying worms have discovered a group of cells that help the body transition from wakefulness to slumber.


Combining experts and automation in 3D printing



Posted: 31 May 2018 01:22 PM PDT


Researchers have developed a novel approach to optimizing soft material 3D printing. The researchers' Expert-Guided Optimization method combines expert judgment with an optimization algorithm that efficiently searches combinations of parameters relevant for 3D printing, enabling high-fidelity soft material products to be printed.


An artificial nerve system gives prosthetic devices and robots a sense of touch



Posted: 31 May 2018 11:31 AM PDT


Researchers have developed an artificial nervous system that could give prosthetic limbs or robots reflexes and the ability to sense touch.


Symptoms worsen around menses for people with borderline personality disorder



Posted: 31 May 2018 11:31 AM PDT


Symptoms associated with borderline personality disorder -- a severe and chronic mood disorder characterized by an inability to manage strong emotions -- tend to worsen just before and during menses.


Mother knows best -- how plants help offspring by passing on seasonal clues



Posted: 31 May 2018 11:30 AM PDT


New research has delved into the genetic memory systems through which plants pass seasonal information down to their seeds to give them the best chance of reproductive success.


Impact of dengue virus on Ethiopia



Posted: 31 May 2018 11:30 AM PDT


Dengue, a mosquito-borne RNA virus, is one of the most serious and rapidly spreading arboviral diseases in the world. Now, researchers have provided the first baseline data on the prevalence and risk factors of the virus in Ethiopia.


Biosecurity reduces invasions of plant pathogens over a national border



Posted: 31 May 2018 11:30 AM PDT


A new study examines more than a century of fungal pathogens, finding well-aimed biosecurity measures cut the spread of unwanted fungi into a nation, even in the face of increased globalized trade.


Bacteria ensure square meal for bloodsucking ticks



Posted: 31 May 2018 11:30 AM PDT


How do ticks live solely on blood? A study has elucidated the crucial role played by symbiotic bacteria that synthesize B vitamins. These nutrients are scarcely found in the blood ticks ingest but are essential to their life cycle. The study has also shown that the bacteria inherited their B vitamin synthesis pathways from a pathogenic ancestor whose genome underwent gradual degradation.


Two ancient populations that diverged later 'reconverged' in the Americas



Posted: 31 May 2018 11:29 AM PDT


A new genetic study of ancient individuals in the Americas and their contemporary descendants finds that two populations that diverged from one another 18,000 to 15,000 years ago remained apart for millennia before mixing again. This historic ;reconvergence; occurred before or during their expansion to the southern continent.


Atherosclerosis: Stopped on time



Posted: 31 May 2018 11:29 AM PDT


For the first time, researchers are pointing out the influence of the internal clock on atherosclerosis. Their study gives an important indication on how the therapeutic approach can be improved.


Antifungal drug eliminates sleeping bowel cancer cells in mice



Posted: 31 May 2018 11:29 AM PDT


An antifungal medication, commonly prescribed for toenail infections, could help eliminate dormant cells within bowel tumors, according to new research.


Scientists rethink co-evolution of marine life, oxygenated oceans



Posted: 31 May 2018 11:29 AM PDT


Researchers have confirmed that rising oceanic and atmospheric oxygen levels co-evolved with marine life hundreds of millions of years ago.


Abnormal lipid metabolism in fat cells predicts future weight gain and diabetes in women



Posted: 31 May 2018 11:28 AM PDT


The inefficient breakdown of fats predicts later weight gain and metabolic complications such as type 2 diabetes in women, researchers report. Low levels of hormone-stimulated lipolysis -- a biochemical process by which triglycerides are broken down into energy-rich fatty acids -- were associated with weight gain and metabolic problems 13 years later. The researchers also developed an algorithm to detect impairments in hormone-stimulated lipolysis using clinical and blood measures.


Secrets behind Pluto's dunes revealed



Posted: 31 May 2018 11:27 AM PDT


Scientists have discovered dunes on Pluto, and say they are likely to have been formed of methane ice grains released into its rarefied atmosphere.


Lego-like chemical building blocks self-assemble into catalyst for hydrogen fuel cells



Posted: 31 May 2018 10:53 AM PDT


What's better than platinum? In hydrogen fuel cells, the answer may be cofacial cobalt porphyrins. These self-assembled molecules -- which are great at facilitating a chemical reaction needed to produce power from hydrogen and oxygen -- could be the next advance in alternative energy.


Sintering solutions aboard the International Space Station



Posted: 31 May 2018 10:53 AM PDT


A centuries-old materials bonding process is being tested aboard the International Space Station in an experiment that could pave the way for more materials research of its kind aboard the orbiting laboratory. Sintering is the process of heating different materials to compress their particles together.


How Earth slows the solar wind to a gentle breeze



Posted: 31 May 2018 10:11 AM PDT


A new study describes the first observations of the process of electron heating in Earth's bow shock. The researchers found that when the electrons in the solar wind encounter the bow shock, they momentarily accelerate to such a high speed that the electron stream becomes unstable and breaks down. This breakdown process robs the electrons of their high speed and converts the energy to heat.


Cool weather can amplify attacks of tree-killing bark beetle



Posted: 31 May 2018 10:11 AM PDT


New research looks at how the destructive southern pine beetle reacts to cooler weather in its climate-induced, new northern ranges.


News flash about hot flashes: They can last longer than you think



Posted: 31 May 2018 10:11 AM PDT


Menopause symptoms are not just for midlife anymore, according to a new study.


New findings link estrogen and T cell immune response to autoimmune inflammation



Posted: 31 May 2018 10:11 AM PDT


Women are more prone to the development of autoimmune diseases. The female hormone estrogen is likely to affect the immune system. A team of scientists reported new findings related to the involvement of estrogen hormone receptor in autoimmune diseases.


'Why not take a risk' attitude widespread among patients and providers



Posted: 31 May 2018 10:11 AM PDT


A new study finds the 'Why not take a risk?' mentality is widespread among patients and medical care providers.


Psychologists: Women are not to blame for the wage gap



Posted: 31 May 2018 10:11 AM PDT


Women should not be blamed for the gender wage gap in the United States, according to psychologists. To eliminate the gap, organizations must provide training, support and opportunities for growth, the researchers said.


From face recognition to phase recognition



Posted: 31 May 2018 10:11 AM PDT


Scientists use approach analogous to facial-recognition technology to track atomic-scale rearrangements relevant to phase changes, catalytic reactions, and more.


Memory depends on protein 'off-switch'



Posted: 31 May 2018 10:10 AM PDT


Memory, learning and cognitive flexibility depend on a protein 'off-switch' in the brain, according to a breakthrough discovery.


Getting conservationists and fishers on the same page



Posted: 31 May 2018 08:46 AM PDT


Historically, fisheries and the conservation community have struggled to find common ground. Now, a new online tool provides daily computer-generated maps to help fishers target productive fishing spots while alerting them to areas likely to harbor protected species.


Alternative inflation rate may offer more accurate economic guidance



Posted: 31 May 2018 08:46 AM PDT


Consumer prices may be more volatile than are represented in current inflation indexes, which are used to guide a range of economic decisions, including guidance on interest rates and Social Security cost-of-living adjustments.


Your brain is multitasking, using a hunger peptide that tells you when to eat



Posted: 31 May 2018 08:46 AM PDT


Scientists have figured out how your brain tells you that you are hungry. They found that a neuropeptide associated with appetite is sent into the cerebrospinal fluid to connect with neurons responsible for alerting hunger.


This is your brain detecting patterns



Posted: 31 May 2018 08:46 AM PDT


Detecting patterns is an important part of how humans learn and make decisions. Now, researchers have seen what is happening in people's brains as they first find patterns in information they are presented.


Sugarcane pest produces foam to protect itself from heat



Posted: 31 May 2018 08:46 AM PDT


Brazilian researchers found that the root spittlebug nymph produces bubbles by feeding on sap, to form a thermal insulator foam that maintains an optimal body temperatures during development. Knowledge of the foam's physical and chemical properties can pave the way for research on compounds that could destabilize the bubbles and eliminate the pests' nymphs in the process.


Paving the way for safer, smaller batteries and fuel cells



Posted: 31 May 2018 08:46 AM PDT


Engineers have found a new and versatile kind of solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) that has twice the proton conductivity of the current state-of-the-art material. Such SPEs are currently found in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, but the researchers' new design could also be adapted to work for the lithium or sodium-ion batteries found in consumer electronics.


AI researchers design 'privacy filter' for your photos



Posted: 31 May 2018 08:46 AM PDT


As concerns over privacy and data security on social networks grow, researchers have created an algorithm to dynamically disrupt facial recognition systems.


Ocean-migrating trout adapt to freshwater environment in 120 years



Posted: 31 May 2018 08:46 AM PDT


Steelhead trout, a member of the salmon family that live and grow in the Pacific Ocean, genetically adapted to the freshwater environment of Lake Michigan in less than 120 years.


Oil and gas wastewater as dust suppressant less than ideal



Posted: 31 May 2018 07:28 AM PDT


At the least, wastewater from oil and gas drilling should be treated in a waste treatment facility before it is used on dirt roads to suppress dust or deice roads. At the best, affordable, nontoxic dust suppressants should be developed and used, according to a multidisciplinary team of researchers.


Number of wild mountain gorillas exceeds 1,000



Posted: 31 May 2018 07:26 AM PDT


A recent census of the critically endangered mountain gorillas conducted in the Virunga Volcanoes found a minimum of 604 individuals. In combination with the 400 individuals living in the only other population in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, these new results push the total number of wild mountain gorillas in the world to over 1000.


Goodbye 'stress granules': Study expands possibilities for treating neurological diseases



Posted: 31 May 2018 05:44 AM PDT


Cell biologists have deepened understanding of proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases. The findings could open up new treatment approaches for disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), among others.


Scientists boost crop production by 47 percent by speeding up photorespiration



Posted: 31 May 2018 05:44 AM PDT


Increasing production of a common, naturally occurring protein in plant leaves could boost the yields of major food crops by almost 50 percent, according to a new study.


Social ties could preserve memory, slow brain aging



Posted: 31 May 2018 05:44 AM PDT


A strong social network could be the key to preserving memory. New research has found that mice housed in groups had better memories and healthier brains than animals that lived in pairs.


Drugs that suppress immune system may protect against Parkinson's



Posted: 31 May 2018 05:44 AM PDT


A new study shows that people who take drugs that suppress the immune system are less likely to develop Parkinson's disease, which is characterized by difficulty with movement.


Less is more when it comes to predicting molecules' conductivity



Posted: 31 May 2018 05:44 AM PDT


Forward-thinking scientists in the 1970s suggested that circuits could be built using molecules instead of wires, and over the past decades that technology has become reality. Chemists present an innovative method that cuts computational costs and improves accuracy by calculating interactions between pairs of electrons and extrapolating those to the rest of the molecule.


Climate change increasing risks of lightning-ignited fires



Posted: 31 May 2018 05:44 AM PDT


Fires ignited by lightning have and will likely continue to increase across the Mediterranean and temperate regions in the Southern Hemisphere under a warmer climate, according to a new study co-led by a Portland State University researcher.


Study estimates increased death rate in Puerto Rico in months after Hurricane Maria



Posted: 31 May 2018 05:42 AM PDT


The mortality rate in Puerto Rico rose by 62 percent [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 11percent to 114 percent] after Hurricane Maria, according to a new study.


Insufficient vitamin D linked to miscarriage among women with prior pregnancy loss



Posted: 30 May 2018 04:22 PM PDT


Among women planning to conceive after a pregnancy loss, those who had sufficient levels of vitamin D were more likely to become pregnant and have a live birth, compared to women with insufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a recent analysis.


Ban e-cig flavors and misleading advertisements to protect youth, says global respiratory group



Posted: 30 May 2018 04:22 PM PDT


Respiratory doctors and scientists from six continents have warned of the dangers posed to children and adolescents by electronic cigarettes. They are calling for an immediate ban on flavorings and on marketing e-cigarettes as lower risk alternatives to children and adolescents.
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