ScienceDaily: Latest Science News

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ScienceDaily: Latest Science News


Leading Antarctic experts offer two possible views of continent's future
This is what a stretchy circuit looks like
DNA 'fossils' in fish, amphibians, and reptiles reveal deep diversity of retroviruses
AI-driven ultrafast technology visually identifies cells without images
The neurons that rewrite traumatic memories
Astronomers see distant eruption as black hole destroys star
Scientists have captured the elusive cell that can regenerate an entire flatworm
Climate change has fish moving faster than regulations can keep up
Brain changes linked to sleep need
Early birds less prone to depression
Ocean waves following sea ice loss trigger Antarctic ice shelf collapse
Tobacco aside, e-cigarette flavorings may harm blood vessels
Amber fossils provide oldest evidence of frogs in wet, tropical forests
Scientists identify enzyme responsible for vascular damage caused by aircraft noise
Allergen in red meat linked to heart disease
Plants open their pores and scientists strike gold
Endocrine-disrupting pesticides impair frog reproduction
Long suspected theory about the moon holds water


Leading Antarctic experts offer two possible views of continent's future



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:38 PM PDT


The next 10 years will be critical for the future of Antarctica, and choices made will have long-lasting consequences, says an international group of Antarctic research scientists. It lays out two different plausible future scenarios for the continent and its Southern Ocean over the next 50 years.


This is what a stretchy circuit looks like



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:38 PM PDT


Researchers have made a new hybrid conductive material -- part elastic polymer, part liquid metal -- that can be bent and stretched at will. Circuits made with this material can take most two-dimensional shapes and are also non-toxic.


DNA 'fossils' in fish, amphibians, and reptiles reveal deep diversity of retroviruses



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:38 PM PDT


Retroviruses, a broad category of viruses that infect humans and other vertebrates, have much greater diversity than previously thought, according to new research.


AI-driven ultrafast technology visually identifies cells without images



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:38 PM PDT


A team made of a scientific start-up company and academic researchers has invented a new cell identification and sorting system called Ghost Cytometry. The system combines a novel imaging technique with artificial intelligence to identify and sort cells with unprecedented high-throughput speed. The scientists leading the project hope that their method will be used to identify and sort cancer cells circulating in patients' blood, enable faster drug discovery, and improve the quality of cell-based medicine.


The neurons that rewrite traumatic memories



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:38 PM PDT


Neuroscientists have located the cells that help reprogram long-lasting memories of traumatic experiences towards safety, a first in neuroscience.


Astronomers see distant eruption as black hole destroys star



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:38 PM PDT


Scientists get first direct images showing fast-moving jet of particles ejected as a supermassive black hole at the core of a galaxy shreds a passing star.


Scientists have captured the elusive cell that can regenerate an entire flatworm



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:38 PM PDT


Researchers have captured the one cell that is capable of regenerating an entire organism.


Climate change has fish moving faster than regulations can keep up



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:37 PM PDT


The world's system for allocating fish stocks is being outpaced by the movement of fish species in response to climate change, according to a study undertaken by an international team of marine ecologists, fisheries and social scientists, and lawyers.


Brain changes linked to sleep need



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:27 PM PDT


We've all experienced going to bed tired and waking up refreshed, yet how that happens at the molecular level remains a mystery. An international study sheds new light on the biochemistry of sleep need in the brain.


Early birds less prone to depression



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:26 PM PDT


A study of 32,000 women found that those with an early chronotype, or sleep-wake preference, were significantly less likely to develop depression.


Ocean waves following sea ice loss trigger Antarctic ice shelf collapse



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:52 AM PDT


Storm-driven ocean swells have triggered the catastrophic disintegration of Antarctic ice shelves in recent decades, according to new research published in Nature today.


Tobacco aside, e-cigarette flavorings may harm blood vessels



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:52 AM PDT


Flavoring chemicals widely used in e-cigarettes and other tobacco products may be toxic to the cells that line and regulate blood vessel function. The adverse effects observed with chemical flavor additives on endothelial cells could be early warning signs of future heart disease, researchers say.


Amber fossils provide oldest evidence of frogs in wet, tropical forests



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:52 AM PDT


99-million-year-old amber fossils from Myanmar provide the earliest evidence of frogs in wet, tropical forests.


Scientists identify enzyme responsible for vascular damage caused by aircraft noise



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:52 AM PDT


In a recent study, scientists have identified an enzyme responsible for aircraft-related vascular damage. The researchers were also able to show that night-time noise has a particularly harmful effect and thus demand that night-time sleep be protected from noise.


Allergen in red meat linked to heart disease



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:52 AM PDT


A team of researchers says it has linked sensitivity to an allergen in red meat to the buildup of plaque in the arteries of the heart. While high saturated fat levels in red meat have long been known to contribute to heart disease for people in general, the new finding suggests that a subgroup of the population may be at heightened risk for a different reason -- a food allergen.


Plants open their pores and scientists strike gold



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:52 AM PDT


Plants containing the element gold are already widely known. The flowering perennial plant alfafa, for example, has been cultivated by scientists to contain pure gold in its plant tissue. Now researchers have identified and investigated the characteristics of gold nanoparticles in two plant species growing in their natural environments.


Endocrine-disrupting pesticides impair frog reproduction



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:51 AM PDT


In a new study, researchers have investigated how the endocrine-disrupting substance linuron affects reproduction in the West African clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis. The scientists found that linuron, which is used as a pesticicide, impaired the males' fertility, and that tadpoles developed ovaries instead of testicles to a greater extent, which caused a female-biased sex ratio.


Long suspected theory about the moon holds water



Posted: 14 Jun 2018 06:50 AM PDT


Scientists have discovered a mineral known as moganite in a lunar meteorite found in a hot desert in northwest Africa.
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