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ScienceDaily: Living Well News


Slower runners benefit most from elite methods
Women scarce in the one percent
High cadence cycling offers no benefit to amateurs, finds new study
Walking simulation games signal a new literary genre
Obstructive sleep apnea linked to inflammation, organ dysfunction
More is better when coordinating with others


Slower runners benefit most from elite methods



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 01:00 PM PST


How much do high-tech shoes, special diets and exercises, drafting behind other runners and other strategies to improve your 'running economy' actually improve your finish time? A new study spells it out. The takeaway: The faster you are, the harder it is to get faster.


Women scarce in the one percent



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 01:00 PM PST


Looking at income inequality reveals vast gender inequality as well, according to a new study. While the families earning in the top one percent of American household incomes receive nearly one-fourth of all U.S. income, the bulk of earning is done by men. Women's income alone is sufficient for one percent status in only five percent of elite households. Moreover, women's income contributes to achieving one percent ranking in only 15 percent of households.


High cadence cycling offers no benefit to amateurs, finds new study



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 09:01 AM PST


A new study has found that exercise efficiency decreases in recreational cyclists when they pedal very hard, incorporating more revolutions per minute.


Walking simulation games signal a new literary genre



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 07:47 AM PST


Walking simulation games signal a new literary genre Research has revealed that walking simulations are blurring the boundaries of different art forms to create a new literary genre. Walking simulations -- video games where there are no winners and no one is shot at or killed -- have become increasingly popular in the last few years.


Obstructive sleep apnea linked to inflammation, organ dysfunction



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 06:25 AM PST


Voyagers no longer embark in search of the storied Fountain of Youth, but the quest for longevity is still very much alive for researchers. Chronological age -- the passing of time one spends on this planet -- cannot be reversed, of course. However, biological age -- one's health relative to that of one's peers -- can be turned back. Healthy lifestyle habits contribute to "aging well," meaning one's biological age is younger than one's chronological age, researchers said. And sleep is a major factor in how well one ages.


More is better when coordinating with others



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 05:15 AM PST


Researchers have demonstrated that physical coordination is more beneficial in larger groups.
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