ScienceDaily: Living Well News

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ScienceDaily: Living Well News

Many choices seems promising until you actually have to choose Downward head tilt can make people seem more dominant Monitoring educational equity Sensing food textures is a matter of pressure Married US moms aim to have first baby in the spring Braces won't always bring happiness Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing 'Safety bubble' expands during third trimester Formation of habitual use drives cannabis addiction Exercise may have different effects in the morning and evening Lack of suitable roads for bicycling

Many choices seems promising until you actually have to choose

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 12:37 PM PDT

People faced with more options than they can effectively consider want to make a good decision, but feel they're unable to do so, according to the results of a novel study. Despite the apparent opportunities presented by a lot of options, the need to choose creates a 'paralyzing paradox,' according to the authors. 'You want to make a good choice, but feel like you can't.'

Downward head tilt can make people seem more dominant

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 10:37 AM PDT

We often look to people's faces for signs of how they're thinking or feeling, trying to gauge whether their eyes are narrowed or widened, whether the mouth is turned up or down. But new findings show that facial features aren't the only source of this information -- we also draw social inferences from the head itself.

Monitoring educational equity

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 09:37 AM PDT

A centralized, consistently reported system of indicators of educational equity is needed to bring attention to disparities in the US education system, says a new report. Indicators -- measures used to track performance and monitor change over time -- can help convey why disparities arise, identify groups most affected by them, and inform policy and practice measures to improve equity in pre-K through 12th grade education.

Sensing food textures is a matter of pressure

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 09:10 AM PDT

Food's texture affects whether it is eaten, liked or rejected, according to researchers, who say some people are better at detecting even minor differences in consistency because their tongues can perceive particle sizes.

Married US moms aim to have first baby in the spring

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 09:10 AM PDT

Educated and married American moms are more likely to try to time their pregnancy so that they have their first baby in the spring, according to new research.

Braces won't always bring happiness

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT

New research overturns the belief that turning your crooked teeth into a beautiful smile will automatically boost your self-confidence.

Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT

Spending at least two hours a week in nature may be a crucial threshold for promoting health and wellbeing, according to a new large-scale study.

'Safety bubble' expands during third trimester

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT

Women undergo a significant mental as well as physical change during the late stages of pregnancy.

Formation of habitual use drives cannabis addiction

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT

A shift from brain systems controlling reward-driven use to habit-driven use differentiates heavy cannabis users who are addicted to the drug from users who aren't, according to a new study. The findings help explain how the brain becomes dependent on cannabis, and why not all cannabis users develop an addiction, even with long-term regular use.

Exercise may have different effects in the morning and evening

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT

Researchers have learned that the effect of exercise may differ depending on the time of day it is performed. In mice they demonstrate that exercise in the morning results in an increased metabolic response in skeletal muscle, while exercise later in the day increases energy expenditure for an extended period of time.

Lack of suitable roads for bicycling

Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:51 AM PDT

A researcher says a lack of suitable roads is a big reason why cycling participation rates in Australia and Queensland are so low.

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