ScienceDaily: Matter & Energy News

11 days ago


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ScienceDaily: Matter & Energy News


'Realistic' new model points the way to more efficient and profitable fracking
Gene-editing tool CRISPR repurposed to develop better antibiotics
Technique identifies electricity-producing bacteria
3D printing 100 times faster with light
Making ammonia 'greener'
Powerful microscope captures first image of nanoscaffold that promotes cell movement


'Realistic' new model points the way to more efficient and profitable fracking



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 04:25 PM PST


A new computational model could potentially boost efficiencies and profits in natural gas production by better predicting previously hidden fracture mechanics. It also accurately accounts for the known amounts of gas released during the process.


Gene-editing tool CRISPR repurposed to develop better antibiotics



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 04:25 PM PST


Scientists have repurposed the gene-editing tool CRISPR to study which genes are targeted by particular antibiotics, providing clues on how to improve existing antibiotics or develop new ones.


Technique identifies electricity-producing bacteria



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 11:37 AM PST


Engineers have developed a microfluidic technique that can quickly process small samples of bacteria and gauge a specific property that's highly correlated with bacteria's ability to produce electricity. They say that this property, known as polarizability, can be used to assess a bacteria's electrochemical activity in a safer, more efficient manner compared to current techniques.


3D printing 100 times faster with light



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 11:37 AM PST


Rather than building up plastic filaments layer by layer, a new approach to 3D printing lifts complex shapes from a vat of liquid at up to 100 times faster than conventional 3D printing processes.


Making ammonia 'greener'



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 11:37 AM PST


Researchers have come up with a new way to create ammonia from nitrogen and water at low temperature and low pressure. They've done it successfully so far in a laboratory without using hydrogen or the solid metal catalyst necessary in traditional processes.


Powerful microscope captures first image of nanoscaffold that promotes cell movement



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:51 AM PST


Using one of the most powerful microscopes in the world, scientists have identified a dense, dynamic and disorganized actin filament nanoscaffold -- resembling a haystack -- that is induced in response to a molecular signal. This is the first time researchers have directly visualized, at the molecular level, a structure that is triggered in response to a cellular signal -- a key finding that expands our understanding of how cells move.
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