ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News

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ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News


The combination of two proteins exerts a regenerating effect in Parkinson's disease
Does an exploding brain network cause chronic pain?
New method to map miniature brain circuits
Genetic analysis can improve depression therapy
New technology will create brain wiring diagrams
Newborn immune activation may have long-term negative impact on brain function
Glucose-induced nerve damage: Research identifies underlying mechanisms
Anxiety: An early indicator of Alzheimer's disease?
Can writing your 'to-do's' help you to doze? Study suggests jotting down tasks can
Emotionally demanding workload and confrontational patients key stressors for GPs
Do less harm: E-cigarettes a safer option than smoking, experts say
Scientists make cells that enable the sense of touch
Surprise: A virus-like protein is important for cognition and memory
Students more engaged and attentive following outdoor lesson in nature
Are there signs of CTE in the brain tissue of younger people with epilepsy?
Stigma continues to hamper response to opioid epidemic
Oversimplifying beliefs about causes of mental illness may hinder social acceptance


The combination of two proteins exerts a regenerating effect in Parkinson's disease



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 10:29 AM PST


Current therapies for Parkinson's disease are mainly of a replacement type and pose problems in the long term, so the challenge is to establish an early diagnosis and develop neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies that will allow the symptoms of the disease to be slowed down or even reversed. Researcher have now documented the regenerative, neuroprotective effect of two neurotrophic factors when they are applied in a combined way.


Does an exploding brain network cause chronic pain?



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 10:29 AM PST


New research reports that hyperreactive brain networks could play a part in the hypersensitivity of fibromyalgia.


New method to map miniature brain circuits



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 10:29 AM PST


In a feat of nanoengineering, scientists have developed a new technique to map electrical circuits in the brain far more comprehensively than ever before. Scientists worldwide could use the technique to uncover the architecture of different parts of the brain.


Genetic analysis can improve depression therapy



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 07:51 AM PST


The failure of SSRI antidepressants can be a result of genetic variations in patients. Variations within the gene that encodes the CYP2C19 enzyme results in extreme differences in the levels of escitalopram achieved in patients, according to a new study. Prescribing the dose of escitalopram based on a patient's specific genetic constitution would greatly improve therapeutic outcomes.


New technology will create brain wiring diagrams



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 06:59 AM PST


Scientists have developed new technology that allows them to see which neurons are talking to which other neurons in live fruit flies.


Newborn immune activation may have long-term negative impact on brain function



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 06:59 AM PST


Neuroscientists have found that even a brief episode of immune system activation within days of birth can cause persistent changes in sleep patterns concurrent with increases in epilepsy-like brain activity -- a combination of symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions.


Glucose-induced nerve damage: Research identifies underlying mechanisms



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 06:12 AM PST


New research has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy also plays a role in peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. The significance of the identification of a common molecular mechanism is that the drug candidates she identified to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy could potentially be used to treat peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes as well.


Anxiety: An early indicator of Alzheimer's disease?



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 06:12 AM PST


A new study suggests an association between elevated amyloid beta levels and the worsening of anxiety symptoms. The findings support the hypothesis that neuropsychiatric symptoms could represent the early manifestation of Alzheimer's disease in older adults.


Can writing your 'to-do's' help you to doze? Study suggests jotting down tasks can



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 07:40 PM PST


Writing a 'to-do' list at bedtime may aid in falling asleep, according to a new study. Research compared sleep patterns of participants who took five minutes to write down upcoming duties versus participants who chronicled completed activities.


Emotionally demanding workload and confrontational patients key stressors for GPs



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 07:40 PM PST


The emotional impact of their daily workload and confrontational patients are among the key stressors for family doctors in England, reveals an analysis of feedback from general practitioners.


Do less harm: E-cigarettes a safer option than smoking, experts say



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 11:16 AM PST


A new article focuses on harm minimization and smoking cessation, with alternative nicotine products like e-cigarettes emerging as a promising avenue for people who want to quit smoking.


Scientists make cells that enable the sense of touch



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 11:15 AM PST


Researchers have, for the first time, coaxed human stem cells to become sensory interneurons -- the cells that give us our sense of touch. The new protocol could be a step toward stem cell-based therapies to restore sensation in paralyzed people who have lost feeling in parts of their body.


Surprise: A virus-like protein is important for cognition and memory



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 11:14 AM PST


A protein pivotal to how the brain acquires knowledge originated from a chance evolutionary event that occurred hundreds of millions of years ago. The protein, called Arc, is involved in storing long-term memories and learning. But new research shows that Arc looks and acts like a protein from viruses.


Students more engaged and attentive following outdoor lesson in nature



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 08:53 AM PST


A study has found that children are significantly more attentive and engaged with their schoolwork following an outdoor lesson in nature. Teachers could teach uninterrupted for almost twice as long during a subsequent indoor lesson. Outdoor lessons may be an inexpensive and convenient way to improve student engagement.


Are there signs of CTE in the brain tissue of younger people with epilepsy?



Posted: 10 Jan 2018 01:35 PM PST


Younger adults with difficult-to-treat epilepsy may have early signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in their brain tissue, but it appears to be uncommon, according to a small, preliminary study.


Stigma continues to hamper response to opioid epidemic



Posted: 10 Jan 2018 09:02 AM PST


Efforts to reverse the nation's opioid epidemic remain beset by the stigma associated with drug use, a group of researchers write in a year-end review. The researchers emphasize the need for the American health care system to embrace medications such as methadone to treat opioid use disorder, provide addiction treatment in primary care clinics and develop non-addictive alternatives for chronic pain.


Oversimplifying beliefs about causes of mental illness may hinder social acceptance



Posted: 09 Jan 2018 01:15 PM PST


Belief that mental illness is biological has increased among both health experts and the public in recent years. But campaigns to treat it as a disease and remove stigma may be lacking because other factors, such as bad character and upbringing, still are viewed as playing a role, a new study has found.
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