ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News

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ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News


Sidestepping the pitfalls of overconfidence with plausible deniability
Insights on the effects of exercise on cognitive performance
Oscillations provide insights into the brain's navigation system
How the grid cell system of the brain maps mental spaces
Clues that suggest people are lying may be deceptive, study shows
Early changes to synapse gene regulation may cause Alzheimer's disease
Why don't we understand statistics? Fixed mindsets may be to blame
Effects of a high-fat diet may be passed on for three generations
How parenting affects antisocial behaviors in children
Photoactive bacteria bait may help in fight against MRSA infections
Fake or real? New study finds consumers wary of manipulated photos
Human brain cell transplant offers insights into neurological conditions
Human retinas grown in a dish explain how color vision develops
Higher levels of urinary fluoride associated with ADHD in children
Altruism can be trained
Babies of overweight mothers may risk developing self-regulation problems
Muscular men prefer an unequal society


Sidestepping the pitfalls of overconfidence with plausible deniability



Posted: 12 Oct 2018 10:53 AM PDT


Although confidence can serve as both a blessing and a curse, new research shows how people can reap the rewards without risking the social penalties for overconfidence.


Insights on the effects of exercise on cognitive performance



Posted: 12 Oct 2018 08:02 AM PDT


A new study has looked at the details behind how cognitive performance may improve during aerobic exercise.


Oscillations provide insights into the brain's navigation system



Posted: 12 Oct 2018 08:02 AM PDT


The brain creates a map of our environment, which enables reliable spatial navigation. The Nobel Prize was awarded in 2014 for research into how this navigation system works at the cellular level. Researchers have now shown that the characteristics of this navigation system are also present in brain oscillations that can be measured using depth electrodes in the human brain. The possibility of testing the neuronal navigation system in this way may open up new approaches for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.


How the grid cell system of the brain maps mental spaces



Posted: 12 Oct 2018 07:22 AM PDT


How exactly the grid cell system works in the human brain, and in particular with which temporal dynamics, has until now been speculation. A much-discussed possibility is that the signals from these cells create maps of 'cognitive spaces' in which humans mentally organize and store the complexities of their internal and external environments. A team of scientists has now been able to demonstrate, with electrophysiological evidence, the existence of grid-like activity in the human brain.


Clues that suggest people are lying may be deceptive, study shows



Posted: 12 Oct 2018 06:29 AM PDT


The verbal and physical signs of lying are harder to detect than people believe, a study suggests.


Early changes to synapse gene regulation may cause Alzheimer's disease



Posted: 12 Oct 2018 06:29 AM PDT


New research has revealed a role for splicing proteins in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased phosphorylation of the SRRM2 protein, seen in AD mouse models and human patients, was found to block its transport to the nucleus. This reduced levels of the PQBP1 protein, causing abnormal changes to the splicing of synapse genes and cognitive decline. These phenotypes were reversed by restoring PQBP1 function, suggesting a possible future treatment for AD.


Why don't we understand statistics? Fixed mindsets may be to blame



Posted: 12 Oct 2018 05:27 AM PDT


The first study of why people struggle to solve statistical problems reveals a preference for complicated rather than simpler, more intuitive solutions -- which often leads to failure in solving the problem altogether. The researchers suggest this is due to unfavorable methods of teaching statistics in schools and universities, and highlight the serious consequences when applied to professional settings like court cases.


Effects of a high-fat diet may be passed on for three generations



Posted: 12 Oct 2018 05:27 AM PDT


A high-fat diet in female mice affects their offspring's obesity, insulin resistance and addictive-like behaviors for three generations, according to a new study.


How parenting affects antisocial behaviors in children



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 02:31 PM PDT


In a recent study of the parental caregiving environment, researchers found that within identical twin pairs, the child who experienced harsher behavior and less parental warmth was at a greater risk for developing antisocial behaviors.


Photoactive bacteria bait may help in fight against MRSA infections



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 02:31 PM PDT


Researchers are testing whether a light-active version of heme, the molecule responsible for transporting oxygen in blood circulation, may help people infected with MRSA. Photodynamic therapy, or PDT, involves a compound known as a photosensitizer, which can be activated by visible light to kill diseased cells or bacteria. PDT is a clinically proven method for fighting cancer but has not yet been developed for treating MRSA infections.


Fake or real? New study finds consumers wary of manipulated photos



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 02:31 PM PDT


In the age of fake news and doctored photos, wary consumers are not nearly as gullible as one might presume. But the source of the images does not matter much as people evaluate what is fake and what is real, a study suggests.


Human brain cell transplant offers insights into neurological conditions



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 11:31 AM PDT


Scientists have created a 'window' into the brain, which enables researchers to watch in incredible detail how human brain cells develop and connect to each other in real time.


Human retinas grown in a dish explain how color vision develops



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 11:31 AM PDT


Biologists grew human retina tissue from scratch to determine how cells that allow people to see in color are made.


Higher levels of urinary fluoride associated with ADHD in children



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 10:23 AM PDT


Higher levels of urinary fluoride during pregnancy are associated with more ADHD-like symptoms in school-age children.


Altruism can be trained



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:56 AM PDT


Mental training can effectively cultivate care, compassion and even altruistically motivated behavior psychologists have shown in a recent study.


Babies of overweight mothers may risk developing self-regulation problems



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:56 AM PDT


A mother's weight during early pregnancy may affect how well her baby is able to self-regulate during its first months and years of life. This is according to a study of more than 3100 Finnish women.


Muscular men prefer an unequal society



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:56 AM PDT


For men, physical strength and political attitudes are linked. This is not the case for women. New research shows that ancestral human instincts affect men's political reflections.
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