ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News

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ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News


Perceptions of chronic fatigue syndrome in the emergency department
New role for brain's support cells in controlling circadian rhythms
Men and women remember pain differently
Disconnect between brain's dopamine system and cocaine addiction
Decades-old question about protein found in Alzheimer's brain plaques
Mutation in sodium-potassium pump: Newly discovered serious disease in children
Research fosters communication between smart buildings and people
Speeding up genetic diagnosis of Huntington's disease
Neuroimaging shows social exclusion spurs extremism in those vulnerable to radicalization
Scientists harness machine learning to uncover new insights into the human brain
Women with IBD are at greater risk of mental illness
Newly discovered leukodystrophy in children: Potential cure
Risky decisions: Excessive social media use is comparable to drug addiction
Child abuse linked to risk of suicide in later life
First smartphone app to detect opioid overdose and its precursors
Fake news shared by very few, but those over 65 more likely to pass on such stories
Fear and anger had different effects on conservatives and liberals, study suggests


Perceptions of chronic fatigue syndrome in the emergency department



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 02:10 PM PST


Findings from a novel online questionnaire of people with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) suggest the majority of these patients do not receive proper care, say researchers.


New role for brain's support cells in controlling circadian rhythms



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 11:18 AM PST


A new study has found that astrocytes, previously thought of as just supporting neurons in regulating circadian rhythms, can actually lead the tempo of the body's internal clock and have been shown for the first time to be able to control patterns of daily behavior in mammals.


Men and women remember pain differently



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 11:18 AM PST


Scientists increasingly believe that one of the driving forces in chronic pain -- the number one health problem in both prevalence and burden -- appears to be the memory of earlier pain. Research suggests that there may be variations, based on sex, in the way that pain is remembered in both mice and humans.


Disconnect between brain's dopamine system and cocaine addiction



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 11:18 AM PST


Researchers have revealed significant insight into cocaine addiction, a phenomenon which has grown significantly in the United States since 2015.


Decades-old question about protein found in Alzheimer's brain plaques



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 11:17 AM PST


Alzheimer's-affected brains are riddled with so-called amyloid plaques: protein aggregates consisting mainly of amyloid-beta. However, this amyloid-beta is a fragment produced from a precursor protein whose normal function has remained enigmatic for decades. A team of scientists has now uncovered that this amyloid precursor protein modulates neuronal signal transmission through binding to a specific receptor. Modulating this receptor could potentially help treat Alzheimer's or other brain diseases.


Mutation in sodium-potassium pump: Newly discovered serious disease in children



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 11:17 AM PST


Researchers have mapped out a newly discovered serious disease which causes children to suffer epileptic seizures, loss of magnesium in urine and reduced intelligence.


Research fosters communication between smart buildings and people



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 07:14 AM PST


Researchers found people connect better with a computer-generated avatar that represents building management -- and small talk helped, too.


Speeding up genetic diagnosis of Huntington's disease



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 07:14 AM PST


Elongated segments of DNA cause Huntington's disease and certain other disorders of the brain. Researchers have developed a method to determine the length of the mutated genes quickly and easily.


Neuroimaging shows social exclusion spurs extremism in those vulnerable to radicalization



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 07:14 AM PST


A new study used neuroimaging techniques to show that social exclusion increases the number of ideological and group values worth fighting and dying for in populations vulnerable to radicalization. The study focused on neural activity in a region of the brain related to rule retrieval and sacred values. The results can help guide policies and actions capable of counteracting vulnerability to radicalization and propensity to violent extremism.


Scientists harness machine learning to uncover new insights into the human brain



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 06:10 AM PST


An inter-disciplinary research team has successfully employed machine learning to uncover new insights into the cellular architecture of the human brain. This approach could potentially be used to assess treatment of neurological disorders, and to develop new therapies.


Women with IBD are at greater risk of mental illness



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 05:27 AM PST


A study shows that women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at greater risk of developing a mental illness after giving birth compared to the overall population. Study authors found that more than one-fifth of pregnant women with IBD had a new-onset mental health diagnosis. For every 43 pregnancies, there is one extra case of mental illness in a woman with IBD, compared to other women.


Newly discovered leukodystrophy in children: Potential cure



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 05:26 AM PST


Medical researchers have uncovered a novel disease of children affecting the brain white matter -- the myelin sheath --, leading to severe incapacity and death in some cases. These defects were corrected by a treatment with fingolimod, a drug in use for multiple sclerosis which interferes with this pathway.


Risky decisions: Excessive social media use is comparable to drug addiction



Posted: 10 Jan 2019 05:26 AM PST


Bad decision-making is a trait oftentimes associated with drug addicts and pathological gamblers, but what about people who excessively use social media? New research shows a connection between social media use and impaired risky decision-making, which is commonly deficient in substance addiction.


Child abuse linked to risk of suicide in later life



Posted: 09 Jan 2019 04:25 PM PST


Children who experience physical, sexual, and emotional abuse or neglect are at least two to three times more likely to attempt suicide in later life, according to the largest research review carried out of the topic.


First smartphone app to detect opioid overdose and its precursors



Posted: 09 Jan 2019 11:27 AM PST


Researchers have developed a cellphone app that uses sonar to monitor someone's breathing rate and sense when an opioid overdose has occurred.


Fake news shared by very few, but those over 65 more likely to pass on such stories



Posted: 09 Jan 2019 11:26 AM PST


A small percentage of Americans, less than 9 percent, shared links to so-called 'fake news' sites on Facebook during the 2016 presidential election campaign, but this behavior was disproportionately common among people over the age of 65, according to a new study.


Fear and anger had different effects on conservatives and liberals, study suggests



Posted: 09 Jan 2019 11:26 AM PST


The emotional underpinnings of political ideology motivated how the electorate sought and processed information about the 2016 presidential election and the major issue of climate change, according to a new study.
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