ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News

11 days ago


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ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News


Curricular changes show success by fourth year
Millions on prescription sleeping pills would sleep through a fire alarm
How missing doctor's appointments increases the risk of death
Binge eating and smoking linked to bullying and sexual abuse
Kids: Connection to nature lessens distress, hyperactivity and behavioral problems
Better analysis of psychological flexibility
Parasites from patients with cerebral malaria stick preferentially in their brains
Scope advance reveals first look through all cortical layers of awake brain
Ultra-sturdy bones, with a surprising origin, suggest new osteoporosis approach


Curricular changes show success by fourth year



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 11:37 AM PST


In a four-year study, a group of science faculty finds that student buy-in to a new curriculum, and therefore satisfaction, increases with each successive undergraduate cohort -- and learning gains did not suffer. The researchers say the results of their longitudinal study should help encourage college faculty and administration to create, adapt, and support innovative courses for their students.


Millions on prescription sleeping pills would sleep through a fire alarm



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 08:28 AM PST


Widely prescribed 'benzodiazepine' sleeping pills suppress the sleeping brain's ability to wake us when it senses a threat. But an alternative class of hypnotics currently under development could allow users to rouse in the event of an earthquake, fire alarm or intruder, according to a new study.


How missing doctor's appointments increases the risk of death



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 08:28 AM PST


Missing GP appointments is associated with early death, and those with long-term mental health conditions are at particular risk. In the largest study of its kind, the team examined over 500,000 patients' appointment histories in Scotland, tracked for three years between 2013 and 2016. Patients with mental-health conditions had an eight times greater risk of death and those with physical conditions a threefold increase in all cause mortality.


Binge eating and smoking linked to bullying and sexual abuse



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:51 AM PST


People who ever suffered bullying or sexual abuse have a lower quality of life similar to those living with chronic conditions like heart disease, diabetes, depression or severe anxiety, a new study has found.


Kids: Connection to nature lessens distress, hyperactivity and behavioral problems



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:51 AM PST


A new 16-item parent questionnaire (CNI-PPC) to measure 'connectedness to nature' in very young children has been developed by Dr. Sobko and her collaborator Professor Gavin Brown, Director of the Quantitative Data Analysis and Research Unit at the University of Auckland. The results revealed that parents who saw their child had a closer connection with nature had less distress, less hyperactivity, and fewer behavioral and emotional difficulties, and improved pro-social behavior.


Better analysis of psychological flexibility



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:51 AM PST


New research has for the first time analyzed degrees of psychological flexibility and identified three distinct classes.


Parasites from patients with cerebral malaria stick preferentially in their brains



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:51 AM PST


Scientists have provided, for the first time, evidence which links the ability of red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite to bind to the cells lining the blood vessels of the brain, with the clinical syndrome cerebral malaria.


Scope advance reveals first look through all cortical layers of awake brain



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:09 AM PST


Improvements in three-photon microscopy have allowed scientists to see activity in all layers of the visual cortex and the 'subplate' below.


Ultra-sturdy bones, with a surprising origin, suggest new osteoporosis approach



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:09 AM PST


A handful of brain cells deep in the brain may play a surprising role in controlling women's bone density, according to new research. Researchers showed that blocking a particular set of signals from these cells causes female (but not male) mice to build extraordinarily strong bones and maintain them into old age, raising hopes for new approaches to preventing or treating osteoporosis in older women.
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