ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News

Last Wednesday at 12:20


Text only:


ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News


Balanced reporting of sports head injuries
Drinking and drug-use dreams in recovery tied to more severe addiction history
Uncovering the evolution of the brain
Testosterone limits for female athletes based on 'flawed' research
Slower runners benefit most from elite methods
Women scarce in the one percent
With age comes hearing loss and a greater risk of cognitive decline
Teaching self-driving cars to predict pedestrian movement
Once seen as nerve cells' foot soldier, the axon emerges as decision-maker
Scientists provide new insight on gene mutations associated with autism
Walking simulation games signal a new literary genre
Why bribery works and what changes its effectiveness
Consciousness rests on the brain's ability to sustain rich dynamics of neural activity
Young children who express suicidal ideation understand death better than their peers
How sleep can fight infection
Another early-onset Alzheimer's gene mutation found, and traced back to Africa
Obstructive sleep apnea linked to inflammation, organ dysfunction
What can early adulthood tell us about midlife identity?
More is better when coordinating with others
Learning a second alphabet for a first language


Balanced reporting of sports head injuries



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 04:09 PM PST


A group of more than 60 leading international neuroscientists are asking for balance when reporting on sports-related injury chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).


Drinking and drug-use dreams in recovery tied to more severe addiction history



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 04:08 PM PST


Vivid dreams involving drinking and drug use are common among individuals in recovery. A study finds these relapse dreams are more common in those with more severe clinical histories of alcohol and other drug problems.


Uncovering the evolution of the brain



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 04:08 PM PST


What makes us human, and where does this mysterious property of 'humanness' come from? Humans are genetically similar to chimpanzees and bonobos, yet there exist obvious behavioral and cognitive differences. Now, researchers have developed a strategy to more easily study the early development of human neurons compared with the neurons of nonhuman primates.


Testosterone limits for female athletes based on 'flawed' research



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 01:00 PM PST


New rules governing international track and field competitions would require some women to medically reduce their testosterone levels to compete. A new study suggests the regulations are rooted in flawed science.


Slower runners benefit most from elite methods



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 01:00 PM PST


How much do high-tech shoes, special diets and exercises, drafting behind other runners and other strategies to improve your 'running economy' actually improve your finish time? A new study spells it out. The takeaway: The faster you are, the harder it is to get faster.


Women scarce in the one percent



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 01:00 PM PST


Looking at income inequality reveals vast gender inequality as well, according to a new study. While the families earning in the top one percent of American household incomes receive nearly one-fourth of all U.S. income, the bulk of earning is done by men. Women's income alone is sufficient for one percent status in only five percent of elite households. Moreover, women's income contributes to achieving one percent ranking in only 15 percent of households.


With age comes hearing loss and a greater risk of cognitive decline



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 10:48 AM PST


In a new study, researchers report that hearing impairment is associated with accelerated cognitive decline with age, though the impact of mild hearing loss may be lessened by higher education.


Teaching self-driving cars to predict pedestrian movement



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 10:47 AM PST


By zeroing in on humans' gait, body symmetry and foot placement, researchers are teaching self-driving cars to recognize and predict pedestrian movements with greater precision than current technologies.


Once seen as nerve cells' foot soldier, the axon emerges as decision-maker



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 07:48 AM PST


New research reveals that parts of the neuron are far more complex than once thought.


Scientists provide new insight on gene mutations associated with autism



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 07:47 AM PST


A novel investigation into the impacts of neuronal mutations on autism-related characteristics in humans has been described.


Walking simulation games signal a new literary genre



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 07:47 AM PST


Walking simulation games signal a new literary genre Research has revealed that walking simulations are blurring the boundaries of different art forms to create a new literary genre. Walking simulations -- video games where there are no winners and no one is shot at or killed -- have become increasingly popular in the last few years.


Why bribery works and what changes its effectiveness



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 07:47 AM PST


A new study suggests that greed, and not the willingness to return the favor, is the main reason people give in to bribery. But the research also finds there are times when the almighty buck can be ignored and effects of a bribe can be lessened.


Consciousness rests on the brain's ability to sustain rich dynamics of neural activity



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 07:42 AM PST


Consciousness, from the moment we go to sleep until we wake up, seems to come and go every day. Consciousness can be temporarily abolished by pharmacological agents or more permanently by brain injury. Each of these departures from conscious wakefulness brings about different changes in brain function, behavior and in the brain's neurochemistry. However, they all share a common feature: the lack of reported subjective experience.


Young children who express suicidal ideation understand death better than their peers



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 06:49 AM PST


Four- to six-year-old children who express suicidal thoughts and behaviors have a better understanding of what it means to die than the majority of their peers, reports a new study.


How sleep can fight infection



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 06:48 AM PST


Researchers have discovered why sleep can sometimes be the best medicine. Sleep improves the potential ability of some of the body's immune cells to attach to their targets, according to a new study. The study helps explain how sleep can fight off an infection, whereas other conditions, such as chronic stress, can make the body more susceptible to illness.


Another early-onset Alzheimer's gene mutation found, and traced back to Africa



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 06:26 AM PST


For some of us, they carry the bright blue of our grandfather's eyes. For others they result in the characteristic cleft chin or the familial tendency toward color blindness. But in some families, the genetic mutations handed down from generation to generation aren't as benign. And for one family in particular, the mutation results in early-onset Alzheimer's disease.


Obstructive sleep apnea linked to inflammation, organ dysfunction



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 06:25 AM PST


Voyagers no longer embark in search of the storied Fountain of Youth, but the quest for longevity is still very much alive for researchers. Chronological age -- the passing of time one spends on this planet -- cannot be reversed, of course. However, biological age -- one's health relative to that of one's peers -- can be turned back. Healthy lifestyle habits contribute to "aging well," meaning one's biological age is younger than one's chronological age, researchers said. And sleep is a major factor in how well one ages.


What can early adulthood tell us about midlife identity?



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 05:15 AM PST


A recent study indicates that personality style in young adulthood anticipates identity formation later in life.


More is better when coordinating with others



Posted: 12 Feb 2019 05:15 AM PST


Researchers have demonstrated that physical coordination is more beneficial in larger groups.


Learning a second alphabet for a first language



Posted: 11 Feb 2019 10:15 AM PST


A part of the brain that maps letters to sounds can acquire a second, visually distinct alphabet for the same language, according to a study of English speakers. The research challenges theoretical constraints on the range of visual forms available to represent written language.
You are subscribed to email updates from Mind & Brain News -- ScienceDaily.
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States

Sciencedaily.com

Categories: Science
Age: 14 until 18 year 19 until 30 year 31 until 64 years 65 and older

Deel deze nieuwsbrief op

© 2019