ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News

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ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News


National Poll: Daddy shaming happens too
Opioid alternative? Taming tetrodotoxin for precise painkilling
Using gene editing, neuroscientists develop a new model for autism
Potential new therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease
First blood-brain barrier chip using stem cells
Weighing risks and benefits of drug treatment for major depression
Bullying gets worse as children with autism get older
Specific multinutrient combination benefits patients with early stage Alzheimer's disease
Could playing computer games improve your peripheral vision?
Rescuers often driven by emotion
Reaching and grasping: Learning fine motor coordination changes the brain
Mouse study finds BPA exposure has transgenerational effects on gene linked to autism
Brain activation provides individual-level prediction of bipolar disorder risk
Why fears over smartphone 'addiction' are based on flawed evidence
Indoor tanning may be an addiction abetted by both genetic and psychiatric factors
From face to DNA: New method aims to improve match between DNA sample and face database
Education, intelligence may protect cognition, but don't prevent Alzheimer's disease
Curbing your enthusiasm for overeating
Millions of cardiovascular deaths attributed to not eating enough fruits and vegetables
Dogs mirror owner's stress


National Poll: Daddy shaming happens too



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 11:17 AM PDT


For over a quarter of fathers polled, criticism made them feel less confident as a parent and 1 in 5 say it discourages them from being more involved in parenting.


Opioid alternative? Taming tetrodotoxin for precise painkilling



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 11:14 AM PDT


Alternatives to opioids for treating pain are sorely needed. A study in rats suggests that tetrodotoxin, properly packaged, offers a potentially safe pain block.


Using gene editing, neuroscientists develop a new model for autism



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 11:14 AM PDT


By introducing a gene variant associated with autism into monkeys, researchers hope to study treatment options for severe neurodevelopmental disorders.


Potential new therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 11:14 AM PDT


Apolipoproten E (apoeE) is a major genetic risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease, yet it tends to be understudied as a potential druggable target for the mind-robbing neurodegenerative disease. Now a research team reports that a novel apoE antagonist blocks apoE interaction with N-terminal amyloid precursor protein (APP) and reduces hallmark Alzheimer's-associated pathologies.


First blood-brain barrier chip using stem cells



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 11:14 AM PDT


Researchers have, for the first time, duplicated a patient's blood-brain barrier (BBB), creating a human BBB chip with stem cells, which can be used to develop personalized medicine and new techniques to research brain disorders.


Weighing risks and benefits of drug treatment for major depression



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 11:13 AM PDT


For some people, medication is an effective part of treatment for depression. However, when considering whether to prescribe antidepressant medication for older adults, healthcare providers must weigh the safety risks these medications pose against the often modest benefits they can provide compared to other options.


Bullying gets worse as children with autism get older



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 08:01 AM PDT


Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to experience bullying than children without ASD and this bullying gets worse with age, according to new research.


Specific multinutrient combination benefits patients with early stage Alzheimer's disease



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 08:01 AM PDT


A new longitudinal study has shown that a nutritional drink designated a 'food for special medical purposes' containing the multinutrient combination Fortasyn Connect® can benefit patients with the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment, who are at risk of progressing to the dementia stage of AD.


Could playing computer games improve your peripheral vision?



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 08:01 AM PDT


Researchers have found a significant improvement in the peripheral awareness of people who played computer games specially designed around using peripheral vision. This finding opens up the possibility that these types of games can be used to help improve players' performance in team sports - so they can spot team-mates quicker - or to help them to identify potential hazards at the side of their vision.


Rescuers often driven by emotion



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 06:58 AM PDT


Scientists have found reason can go out the window when people's family members, children and pets are in trouble in the water, and people should be better trained in water rescue skills.


Reaching and grasping: Learning fine motor coordination changes the brain



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 06:39 AM PDT


When we train the reaching for and grasping of objects, we also train our brain. In other words, this action brings about changes in the connections of a certain neuronal population in the red nucleus, a region of the midbrain. Researchers have discovered this group of nerve cells in the red nucleus. They have also shown how fine motor tasks promote plastic reorganization of this brain region.


Mouse study finds BPA exposure has transgenerational effects on gene linked to autism



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 06:29 AM PDT


Transgenerational bisphenol A (BPA) exposure may contribute to autism, according to a mouse study.


Brain activation provides individual-level prediction of bipolar disorder risk



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 05:43 AM PDT


Patterns of brain activation during reward anticipation may help identify people most at risk for developing bipolar spectrum disorders (BPSD), according to a new study. Mania in people with BPSD is often accompanied by impulsivity, including impulsive responses to potential rewards. In the study, patterns of neural activation during a reward task predicted the severity of the mania symptom in young adults who have not yet developed the disorder.


Why fears over smartphone 'addiction' are based on flawed evidence



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 05:43 AM PDT


Researchers say fears over smartphone 'addiction' are based on flawed evidence. Surveys are often used to understand how people use their smartphone, but these are poorly related to actual smartphone use when measured with an app. This means that existing evidence suggesting that screen time is 'addictive' cannot be used to justify any change of policy. High smartphone usage has been linked to anxiety and depression but there is insufficient evidence to support these conclusions.


Indoor tanning may be an addiction abetted by both genetic and psychiatric factors



Posted: 11 Jun 2019 12:56 PM PDT


A combination of elevated symptoms of depression along with modifications in a gene responsible for dopamine activity, important to the brain's pleasure and reward system, appear to influence an addiction to indoor tanning in young, white non-Hispanic women.


From face to DNA: New method aims to improve match between DNA sample and face database



Posted: 11 Jun 2019 12:56 PM PDT


Predicting what someone's face looks like based on a DNA sample remains a hard nut to crack for science. It is, however, getting easier to use such a sample to filter the right face from a face database.


Education, intelligence may protect cognition, but don't prevent Alzheimer's disease



Posted: 11 Jun 2019 12:56 PM PDT


In a search for clues to what may delay or prevent Alzheimer's disease, scientists report that smarter, more educated people aren't protected from the disease, but do get a cognitive 'head start' that may keep their minds functioning better temporarily.


Curbing your enthusiasm for overeating



Posted: 11 Jun 2019 05:19 AM PDT


Signals between our gut and brain control how and when we eat food. But how the molecular mechanisms involved in this signaling are affected when we eat a high-energy diet and how they contribute to obesity are not well understood. Using a mouse model, a research team led by a biomedical scientists has found that overactive endocannabinoid signaling in the gut drives overeating in diet-induced obesity by blocking gut-brain satiation signaling.


Millions of cardiovascular deaths attributed to not eating enough fruits and vegetables



Posted: 10 Jun 2019 07:06 AM PDT


Preliminary findings from a new study reveal that inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption may account for millions of deaths from heart disease and strokes each year. The study estimated that roughly 1 in 7 cardiovascular deaths could be attributed to not eating enough fruit and 1 in 12 cardiovascular deaths could be attributed to not eating enough vegetables.


Dogs mirror owner's stress



Posted: 06 Jun 2019 07:20 AM PDT


The levels of stress in dogs and their owners follow each other, according to a new study. The scientists believe that dogs mirror their owner's stress level, rather than vice versa.
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