ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News

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ScienceDaily: Mind & Brain News


Many choices seems promising until you actually have to choose
Gut microbes eat our medication
Hidden brain signals behind working memory
New model more accurately predicts choices in classic decision-making task
Downward head tilt can make people seem more dominant
Monitoring educational equity
Married US moms aim to have first baby in the spring
The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds 'sound' words predict psychosis
People with mobility issues set to benefit from wearable devices
Growing life expectancy inequality in US cannot be blamed on opioids alone
Braces won't always bring happiness
Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing
Even in young children: Higher weight = higher blood pressure
Financial vulnerability may discourage positive negotiation strategies
'Safety bubble' expands during third trimester
Formation of habitual use drives cannabis addiction
Epilepsy drugs linked to increased risk of suicidal behavior, particularly in young people
Personality traits of drug users


Many choices seems promising until you actually have to choose



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 12:37 PM PDT


People faced with more options than they can effectively consider want to make a good decision, but feel they're unable to do so, according to the results of a novel study. Despite the apparent opportunities presented by a lot of options, the need to choose creates a 'paralyzing paradox,' according to the authors. 'You want to make a good choice, but feel like you can't.'


Gut microbes eat our medication



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 11:36 AM PDT


Researchers have discovered one of the first concrete examples of how the microbiome can interfere with a drug's intended path through the body. Focusing on levodopa (L-dopa), the primary treatment for Parkinson's disease, they identified which bacteria out of the trillions of species is responsible for degrading the drug and how to stop this microbial interference.


Hidden brain signals behind working memory



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 11:35 AM PDT


Making a specific type of brain pattern last longer improves short-term memory in rats, a new study finds.


New model more accurately predicts choices in classic decision-making task



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 11:35 AM PDT


A new mathematical model that predicts which choices people will make in the Iowa Gambling Task, a task used for the past 25 years to study decision-making, outperforms previously developed models.


Downward head tilt can make people seem more dominant



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 10:37 AM PDT


We often look to people's faces for signs of how they're thinking or feeling, trying to gauge whether their eyes are narrowed or widened, whether the mouth is turned up or down. But new findings show that facial features aren't the only source of this information -- we also draw social inferences from the head itself.


Monitoring educational equity



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 09:37 AM PDT


A centralized, consistently reported system of indicators of educational equity is needed to bring attention to disparities in the US education system, says a new report. Indicators -- measures used to track performance and monitor change over time -- can help convey why disparities arise, identify groups most affected by them, and inform policy and practice measures to improve equity in pre-K through 12th grade education.


Married US moms aim to have first baby in the spring



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 09:10 AM PDT


Educated and married American moms are more likely to try to time their pregnancy so that they have their first baby in the spring, according to new research.


The whisper of schizophrenia: Machine learning finds 'sound' words predict psychosis



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 07:45 AM PDT


Automated analysis of the two language variables -- more frequent use of words associated with sound and speaking with low semantic density, or vagueness -- can predict whether an at-risk person will later develop psychosis with 93 percent accuracy.


People with mobility issues set to benefit from wearable devices



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 07:31 AM PDT


Researchers are working on a project to develop wearable rehabilitative devices that can help disabled people sit, stand and walk in comfort.


Growing life expectancy inequality in US cannot be blamed on opioids alone



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 07:31 AM PDT


A new study challenges a popularized view about what's causing the growing gap between the lifespans of more- and less-educated Americans -- finding shortcomings in the widespread narrative that the United States is facing an epidemic of 'despair.'


Braces won't always bring happiness



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT


New research overturns the belief that turning your crooked teeth into a beautiful smile will automatically boost your self-confidence.


Two hours a week is key dose of nature for health and wellbeing



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT


Spending at least two hours a week in nature may be a crucial threshold for promoting health and wellbeing, according to a new large-scale study.


Even in young children: Higher weight = higher blood pressure



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT


Overweight 4-year-olds have a doubled risk of high blood pressure by age six, raising the hazard of future heart attack and stroke.


Financial vulnerability may discourage positive negotiation strategies



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT


People who feel financially vulnerable may be prone to believing incorrectly their success in negotiations must come at the expense of the other party, leading them to ignore the potential for more cooperative and mutually beneficial options.


'Safety bubble' expands during third trimester



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT


Women undergo a significant mental as well as physical change during the late stages of pregnancy.


Formation of habitual use drives cannabis addiction



Posted: 13 Jun 2019 06:52 AM PDT


A shift from brain systems controlling reward-driven use to habit-driven use differentiates heavy cannabis users who are addicted to the drug from users who aren't, according to a new study. The findings help explain how the brain becomes dependent on cannabis, and why not all cannabis users develop an addiction, even with long-term regular use.


Epilepsy drugs linked to increased risk of suicidal behavior, particularly in young people



Posted: 12 Jun 2019 03:36 PM PDT


Treatment with gabapentinoids -- a group of drugs used for epilepsy, nerve pain and anxiety disorders -- is associated with an increased risk of suicidal behavior, unintentional overdose, injuries, and road traffic incidents, finds a new study.


Personality traits of drug users



Posted: 10 Jun 2019 06:56 PM PDT


The social environment is an influential factor with regards to drug addiction. However, some people living in the same environment become drug users, whilst others resist. Is this difference just random or are there key personality traits that help people to avoid drug addiction? Is it possible to evaluate the risk of drug consumption for different personality profiles? Is this risk different for different drugs?
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