ScienceDaily: Most Popular News

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ScienceDaily: Most Popular News


Getting to the root of lavender's secrets
Nerve stimulation in mice suggests new way to reduce delirium after surgery
Opening communication lines between propulsion and airflow poses new questions
Clues from a Somalian cavefish about modern mammals' dark past
Fruit fly protein could be new tool in tackling disease-carrying mosquitoes
Thalamus wakes the brain during development
Novel topological insulator
Effective ketamine doses for treatment-resistant depression
Scientists accidentally reprogram mature mouse GABA neurons into dopaminergic-like neurons
Light switch: Scientists develop method to control nanoscale manipulation in high-powered microscopes
The culprit of superconductivity in cuprates
Molecular link between body weight, early puberty identified
Lassa fever vaccine shows promise and reveals new test for immunity
New techniques can detect lyme disease weeks before current tests
Functional salivary gland organoid created
Gene variants raise risk of migraines in African-American children
A novel biosensor to advance diverse high-level production of microbial cell factories
Low copper levels linked to fatter fat cells
New model mimics human tumors for accurate testing of cancer drugs
Nice people finish last when it comes to money
PIEZO2, a molecular target for treating clinical pain
Recognizing the uniqueness of different individuals with schizophrenia
Versatile molecular system extends the promise of light-activated switches
Molecular mechanisms of ancient herbal remedies
3-in-1 vaccine against traveler's diarrhea
Lung cancer deaths are 28 percent lower in California
Genetics of brain structure and description of largest human genetic study
Molecular details of protein reveal glimpse into how kidney stones form
Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments
How proteins meet on the cell membrane
Researchers show effectiveness of new noninvasive blood glucose test
Innovative sensing technique could improve greenhouse gas analysis
Changes in polar jet circulation bring more dust from Sahara Desert to the Arctic
New appropriate use criteria for lumbar puncture in Alzheimer's diagnosis
A break from the buzz: Bees go silent during total solar eclipse
Reconstructing human history with the help of fecal sterols
A genome under influence
Engineers develop process to 3-D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons


Getting to the root of lavender's secrets



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 11:31 AM PDT


A team of researchers has identified the complete genetic makeup of the lavender plant, Lavandula angustifolia.


Nerve stimulation in mice suggests new way to reduce delirium after surgery



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 11:31 AM PDT


For adults over age 65, surgical complications can dampen not only their physical health but also their mental sharpness, with more than half of high-risk cases declining into delirium. New research shows a current treatment for seizures can also reverse brain inflammation, such as inflammation after surgery, and the subsequent confusion or cognitive decline that results.


Opening communication lines between propulsion and airflow poses new questions



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 10:34 AM PDT


On the runway to more fuel-efficient aircraft, one alternative propulsion scheme being explored is an array of electrically powered ducted fans. The fans are distributed across the wing span or integrated into the wing. Researchers have gained new understanding in how the fans and especially their precise placement on the aircraft can affect the cross-conversation between propulsion and the airflow around the wing.


Clues from a Somalian cavefish about modern mammals' dark past



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 08:24 AM PDT


After millions of years living in darkness, a species of blind cavefish has lost an ancient system of DNA repair. That DNA repair system, found in organisms including bacteria, fungi, plants, and most other animals, harnesses energy from visible light to repair DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) light. The findings are intriguing in part because only placental mammals were previously known to lack this system.


Fruit fly protein could be new tool in tackling disease-carrying mosquitoes



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 08:24 AM PDT


An insulin-binding protein in fruit flies could provide new opportunities for tackling disease-carrying mosquitoes, such as malaria and yellow fever.


Thalamus wakes the brain during development



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 08:24 AM PDT


A new study suggests the thalamus controls the development of state dependency and continuity.


Novel topological insulator



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 08:24 AM PDT


For the first time, physicists have built a unique topological insulator in which optical and electronic excitations hybridize and flow together.


Effective ketamine doses for treatment-resistant depression



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 08:24 AM PDT


A study identifies two subanesthetic dosage levels of the anesthetic drug ketamine that appear to provide significant symptom relief to patients with treatment-resistant depression.


Scientists accidentally reprogram mature mouse GABA neurons into dopaminergic-like neurons



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 08:24 AM PDT


Attempting to make dopamine-producing neurons out of glial cells in mouse brains, a group of researchers instead converted mature inhibitory neurons into dopaminergic cells. Their findings reveal that -- contrary to previous belief -- it is possible to reprogram one mature neuron type into another without first reverting it to a stem-cell-like state.


Light switch: Scientists develop method to control nanoscale manipulation in high-powered microscopes



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 08:24 AM PDT


Researchers from Japan have taken a step toward faster and more advanced electronics by developing a way to better measure and manipulate conductive materials through scanning tunneling microscopy.


The culprit of superconductivity in cuprates



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


Researchers have uncovered an underlying mechanism related to the materials dependence in copper-based high-temperature superconductors. The research may open a new avenue for designing materials with high-temperature superconductivity.


Molecular link between body weight, early puberty identified



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


Becoming overweight at a young age can trigger a molecular chain reaction that leads some girls to experience puberty early, according to new research. Scientists have discovered an enzyme in the brain that behaves differently in fat and thin rats, and leads overweight female rats to have early-onset puberty.


Lassa fever vaccine shows promise and reveals new test for immunity



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


A new Lassa fever and rabies vaccine shows lasting immunity and suggests a new way to test for protection.


New techniques can detect lyme disease weeks before current tests



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


Researchers have developed techniques to detect Lyme disease bacteria weeks sooner than current tests, allowing patients to start treatment earlier.


Functional salivary gland organoid created



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


Scientists have, for the first time, succeeded in growing three-dimensional salivary gland tissue that, when implanted into mice, produced saliva like normal glands.


Gene variants raise risk of migraines in African-American children



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


Researchers have discovered common gene variants associated with migraines in African-American children. The research adds to knowledge of genetic influences on childhood migraine and may lead to future precision medicine treatments for African-American children with these intense headaches.


A novel biosensor to advance diverse high-level production of microbial cell factories



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


A research group presented a novel biosensor which can produce diverse, high-level microbial cell factories. The biosensor monitors the concentration of products and even intermediates when new strains are being developed. This strategy provides a new platform for manufacturing diverse natural products from renewable resources. The team succeeded in creating four natural products of high-level pharmaceutical importance with this strategy.


Low copper levels linked to fatter fat cells



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


In studies of mouse cells, researchers have found that low levels of cellular copper appear to make fat cells fatter by altering how cells process their main metabolic fuels, such as fat and sugar.


New model mimics human tumors for accurate testing of cancer drugs



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


Researchers have genetically engineered a new laboratory model that enables accurate testing of anti-cancer drugs by mimicking the complexity of human cancers. Using this advanced model, researchers will be able to discover the safest and most effective ways to use promising drugs called MCL-1 inhibitors in the clinic.


Nice people finish last when it comes to money



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


Nice people may be at greater risk of bankruptcy and other financial hardships compared with their less agreeable peers, not because they are more cooperative, but because they don't value money as much.


PIEZO2, a molecular target for treating clinical pain



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 11:44 AM PDT


The researchers think topical application of PIEZO2 blockers could be beneficial for patients suffering from neuropathic pain.


Recognizing the uniqueness of different individuals with schizophrenia



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 10:24 AM PDT


Individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia differ greatly from one another. Researchers have demonstrated that very few identical brain differences are shared amongst different patients. Therefore, insights based on research at the group level (i.e. in the 'average' patient) say little about the individual.


Versatile molecular system extends the promise of light-activated switches



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 10:24 AM PDT


A newly-developed molecule is easy to make, simple to work with and may potentially be used for the development of targeted medications and high-density memory devices with the volume of a speck of a dust.


Molecular mechanisms of ancient herbal remedies



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 10:23 AM PDT


Researchers have discovered the molecular basis for a therapeutic action of an ancient herbal medicine used across Africa to treat various illnesses, including epilepsy.


3-in-1 vaccine against traveler's diarrhea



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 10:23 AM PDT


A professor has discovered a novel approach to developing a first-ever vaccine for three common pathogens that cause traveler's diarrhea and kill more than 100,000 children living in developing countries each year. The vaccine yokes together proteins from pathogenic E.coli with sugars from Shigella and Camplyobacter jejuni -- three bugs that are major causes of bacterial diarrhea globally. Currently no licensed vaccines exist against any of these pathogens.


Lung cancer deaths are 28 percent lower in California



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 10:23 AM PDT


Early adoption of tobacco control efforts in California lead to fewer people ever smoking, reduced the amount used by those who do smoke and helped smokers quit at a younger age -- when their risk of developing lung cancer is lowest. As a result, lung cancer deaths are 28 percent lower in California compared to the rest of the country and the gap is widening each year by almost a percentage point.


Genetics of brain structure and description of largest human genetic study



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 10:23 AM PDT


New research describes the release of whole genome genetic data of 500,000 participants of the UK Biobank.


Molecular details of protein reveal glimpse into how kidney stones form



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 09:49 AM PDT


Using the 2017 Nobel Prize-winning technique of cryo-electron microscopy to capture a high-resolution image of an ion channel protein, called TRPV5, that removes calcium from urine, researchers have found fresh clues as to how kidney stones form.


Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 09:49 AM PDT


For all the good they do, eye drops and ointments have one major drawback: It's hard to tell how much of the medication is actually getting to the eye. Now scientists report that they have developed a contact lens that changes color as drugs are released. This visual indicator could help eye doctors and patients readily determine whether these medications are where they should be. 


How proteins meet on the cell membrane



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 09:39 AM PDT


At last, the researchers have defined the molecular basis of the cell membrane in integrin activation.


Researchers show effectiveness of new noninvasive blood glucose test



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 08:19 AM PDT


For those living with diabetes, monitoring blood glucose accurately is necessary to prevent diabetes-related complications. Researchers recently evaluated the accuracy of new technology to monitor blood glucose levels without needles or a finger prick. Early results show that the noninvasive technology measures blood glucose levels as effectively as a finger prick test -- without drawing blood.


Innovative sensing technique could improve greenhouse gas analysis



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 08:19 AM PDT


An international team of researchers has used an unconventional imaging technique known as ghost imaging to make spectroscopic measurements of a gas molecule.


Changes in polar jet circulation bring more dust from Sahara Desert to the Arctic



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:56 AM PDT


Poleward transport of warm, moist, and dust-laden air masses from the Sahara Desert results in ice melting in southeast Greenland, scientists have found.


New appropriate use criteria for lumbar puncture in Alzheimer's diagnosis



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:55 AM PDT


In preparation for more tools that detect and measure the biology associated with Alzheimer's and other dementias earlier and with more accuracy, experts have published appropriate use criteria (AUC) for lumbar puncture (spinal tap) and spinal fluid analysis in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.


A break from the buzz: Bees go silent during total solar eclipse



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:55 AM PDT


In an unprecedented study of a solar eclipse's influence on bee behavior, researchers organized citizen scientists and elementary school classrooms to set up acoustic monitoring stations to listen in on bees' buzzing -- or lack thereof -- as the August 2017 total solar eclipse passed over North America. The results were clear and consistent at locations across the United States: Bees stopped flying during the period of total solar eclipse.


Reconstructing human history with the help of fecal sterols



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:55 AM PDT


The story of human presence on Earth can be told by studying the sediment and soil accumulation of these chemical compounds in human feces.


A genome under influence



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:55 AM PDT


Researchers recently discovered that 95 percent of our genome seems to be affected by selection and other genetic biases and that markers previously thought to be neutral appear to provide skewed estimates. Their study calls for the re-examination of a plethora of results and provides the tools and recommendations to correct such issues in the future.


Engineers develop process to 3-D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:55 AM PDT


Scientists have developed a method to 3-D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons to greatly improve a patient's recovery. A person with a badly damaged ligament, tendon, or ruptured disc could simply have new replacement tissue printed and ultimately implanted in the damaged area.
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