ScienceDaily: Plants & Animals News

11 days ago


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ScienceDaily: Plants & Animals News


Gene-editing tool CRISPR repurposed to develop better antibiotics
Technique identifies electricity-producing bacteria
Longer siesta on bright days
A new mechanism helps explain differences between eukaryotic and bacterial proteomes
Feds, states can help biochar live up to its soil-saving potential
New mathematical model can help save endangered species
Plant phytolith and water content influence rate of tooth enamel abrasion in vertebrates
Powerful microscope captures first image of nanoscaffold that promotes cell movement
The algae's third eye
Skull scans tell tale of how world's first dogs caught their prey
Blueprint for plant immune response found


Gene-editing tool CRISPR repurposed to develop better antibiotics



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 04:25 PM PST


Scientists have repurposed the gene-editing tool CRISPR to study which genes are targeted by particular antibiotics, providing clues on how to improve existing antibiotics or develop new ones.


Technique identifies electricity-producing bacteria



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 11:37 AM PST


Engineers have developed a microfluidic technique that can quickly process small samples of bacteria and gauge a specific property that's highly correlated with bacteria's ability to produce electricity. They say that this property, known as polarizability, can be used to assess a bacteria's electrochemical activity in a safer, more efficient manner compared to current techniques.


Longer siesta on bright days



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 08:29 AM PST


Insects and mammals have special sensors for different light intensities. These sensors selectively influence the circadian clocks and thereby control daily activity patterns.


A new mechanism helps explain differences between eukaryotic and bacterial proteomes



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 08:29 AM PST


What makes distinct species have different proteins? Is there a key that allows eukaryotic cells to produce proteins involved in multicellularity that are mostly absent in prokaryotes?


Feds, states can help biochar live up to its soil-saving potential



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 08:28 AM PST


Researchers have assembled current and potential sources of government support to promote the production and use of biochar, which helps preserve valuable soil, enhance agricultural production, improve local air quality and sequester carbon dioxide.


New mathematical model can help save endangered species



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 08:28 AM PST


One of the greatest challenges in saving endangered species is to predict if an animal population will die out. Accurate and reliable models are crucial for conservationists.


Plant phytolith and water content influence rate of tooth enamel abrasion in vertebrates



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 08:28 AM PST


Plant phytolith and water content cause differing degrees of tooth enamel abrasion in vertebrates. This study has implications for how tooth wear in extinct animals is interpreted and how this information can be employed to reconstruct their dietary behavior and habitats.


Powerful microscope captures first image of nanoscaffold that promotes cell movement



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:51 AM PST


Using one of the most powerful microscopes in the world, scientists have identified a dense, dynamic and disorganized actin filament nanoscaffold -- resembling a haystack -- that is induced in response to a molecular signal. This is the first time researchers have directly visualized, at the molecular level, a structure that is triggered in response to a cellular signal -- a key finding that expands our understanding of how cells move.


The algae's third eye



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:51 AM PST


Scientists have discovered an unusual new light sensor in green algae. The sensor triggers a reaction that is similar to one in the human eye.


Skull scans tell tale of how world's first dogs caught their prey



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:51 AM PST


Analysis of the skulls of lions, wolves and hyenas has helped scientists uncover how prehistoric dogs hunted 40 million years ago.


Blueprint for plant immune response found



Posted: 11 Jan 2019 06:08 AM PST


Researchers have discovered the way plants respond to disease-causing organisms, and how they protect themselves, leading the way to potential breakthroughs in breeding resistance to diseases or pests.
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