ScienceDaily: Top Environment News

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ScienceDaily: Top Environment News


Getting to the root of lavender's secrets
Clues from a Somalian cavefish about modern mammals' dark past
Fruit fly protein could be new tool in tackling disease-carrying mosquitoes
Scientists accidentally reprogram mature mouse GABA neurons into dopaminergic-like neurons
New techniques can detect lyme disease weeks before current tests
Functional salivary gland organoid created
A novel biosensor to advance diverse high-level production of microbial cell factories
Molecular mechanisms of ancient herbal remedies
3-in-1 vaccine against traveler's diarrhea
How proteins meet on the cell membrane
Changes in polar jet circulation bring more dust from Sahara Desert to the Arctic
A break from the buzz: Bees go silent during total solar eclipse
Reconstructing human history with the help of fecal sterols
A genome under influence
Engineers develop process to 3-D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons
Newly discovered bacterium rids problematic pair of toxic groundwater contaminants
Recovering from a heart attack? Hold the antibiotics, mouse study suggests


Getting to the root of lavender's secrets



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 11:31 AM PDT


A team of researchers has identified the complete genetic makeup of the lavender plant, Lavandula angustifolia.


Clues from a Somalian cavefish about modern mammals' dark past



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 08:24 AM PDT


After millions of years living in darkness, a species of blind cavefish has lost an ancient system of DNA repair. That DNA repair system, found in organisms including bacteria, fungi, plants, and most other animals, harnesses energy from visible light to repair DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) light. The findings are intriguing in part because only placental mammals were previously known to lack this system.


Fruit fly protein could be new tool in tackling disease-carrying mosquitoes



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 08:24 AM PDT


An insulin-binding protein in fruit flies could provide new opportunities for tackling disease-carrying mosquitoes, such as malaria and yellow fever.


Scientists accidentally reprogram mature mouse GABA neurons into dopaminergic-like neurons



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 08:24 AM PDT


Attempting to make dopamine-producing neurons out of glial cells in mouse brains, a group of researchers instead converted mature inhibitory neurons into dopaminergic cells. Their findings reveal that -- contrary to previous belief -- it is possible to reprogram one mature neuron type into another without first reverting it to a stem-cell-like state.


New techniques can detect lyme disease weeks before current tests



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


Researchers have developed techniques to detect Lyme disease bacteria weeks sooner than current tests, allowing patients to start treatment earlier.


Functional salivary gland organoid created



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


Scientists have, for the first time, succeeded in growing three-dimensional salivary gland tissue that, when implanted into mice, produced saliva like normal glands.


A novel biosensor to advance diverse high-level production of microbial cell factories



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


A research group presented a novel biosensor which can produce diverse, high-level microbial cell factories. The biosensor monitors the concentration of products and even intermediates when new strains are being developed. This strategy provides a new platform for manufacturing diverse natural products from renewable resources. The team succeeded in creating four natural products of high-level pharmaceutical importance with this strategy.


Molecular mechanisms of ancient herbal remedies



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 10:23 AM PDT


Researchers have discovered the molecular basis for a therapeutic action of an ancient herbal medicine used across Africa to treat various illnesses, including epilepsy.


3-in-1 vaccine against traveler's diarrhea



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 10:23 AM PDT


A professor has discovered a novel approach to developing a first-ever vaccine for three common pathogens that cause traveler's diarrhea and kill more than 100,000 children living in developing countries each year. The vaccine yokes together proteins from pathogenic E.coli with sugars from Shigella and Camplyobacter jejuni -- three bugs that are major causes of bacterial diarrhea globally. Currently no licensed vaccines exist against any of these pathogens.


How proteins meet on the cell membrane



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 09:39 AM PDT


At last, the researchers have defined the molecular basis of the cell membrane in integrin activation.


Changes in polar jet circulation bring more dust from Sahara Desert to the Arctic



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:56 AM PDT


Poleward transport of warm, moist, and dust-laden air masses from the Sahara Desert results in ice melting in southeast Greenland, scientists have found.


A break from the buzz: Bees go silent during total solar eclipse



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:55 AM PDT


In an unprecedented study of a solar eclipse's influence on bee behavior, researchers organized citizen scientists and elementary school classrooms to set up acoustic monitoring stations to listen in on bees' buzzing -- or lack thereof -- as the August 2017 total solar eclipse passed over North America. The results were clear and consistent at locations across the United States: Bees stopped flying during the period of total solar eclipse.


Reconstructing human history with the help of fecal sterols



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:55 AM PDT


The story of human presence on Earth can be told by studying the sediment and soil accumulation of these chemical compounds in human feces.


A genome under influence



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:55 AM PDT


Researchers recently discovered that 95 percent of our genome seems to be affected by selection and other genetic biases and that markers previously thought to be neutral appear to provide skewed estimates. Their study calls for the re-examination of a plethora of results and provides the tools and recommendations to correct such issues in the future.


Engineers develop process to 3-D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:55 AM PDT


Scientists have developed a method to 3-D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons to greatly improve a patient's recovery. A person with a badly damaged ligament, tendon, or ruptured disc could simply have new replacement tissue printed and ultimately implanted in the damaged area.


Newly discovered bacterium rids problematic pair of toxic groundwater contaminants



Posted: 09 Oct 2018 08:50 AM PDT


Researchers have detailed the discovery of the first bacterium known capable of simultaneously degrading the pair of chemical contaminants -- 1,4-Dioxane and 1,1-DCE.


Recovering from a heart attack? Hold the antibiotics, mouse study suggests



Posted: 09 Oct 2018 08:50 AM PDT


An international team of researchers has shown in mice that a healthy gut microbiome is important for recovery after a heart attack.
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