ScienceDaily: Top Health News

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ScienceDaily: Top Health News


New model for uncovering true HIV mortality rates in Zambia
Past exposures shape immune response in pediatric acute respiratory infections
New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs
Scarring molecule in fat tissue links obesity with distressed fat
Localized cooling of the heart limits damage caused by a heart attack
Scleroderma study: Hope for a longer life for patients with rare autoimmune disorder
New warning system discovered in the immune defense
The combination of two proteins exerts a regenerating effect in Parkinson's disease
Does an exploding brain network cause chronic pain?
New method to map miniature brain circuits
Can Muesli help against arthritis?
Genetic analysis can improve depression therapy
New technology will create brain wiring diagrams
Newborn immune activation may have long-term negative impact on brain function
Glucose-induced nerve damage: Research identifies underlying mechanisms
Asthma costs the US economy more than $80 billion per year
Anxiety: An early indicator of Alzheimer's disease?
Can writing your 'to-do's' help you to doze? Study suggests jotting down tasks can
Experts raise concerns over raw meat diets for cats and dogs
Emotionally demanding workload and confrontational patients key stressors for GPs
Risk of non-infectious elephantiasis mapped in Cameroon
Human protein may aid neuron invasion by virus that causes hand, foot, and mouth disease
Different strains of same bacteria trigger widely varying immune responses
Re-programming innate immune cells to fight tuberculosis
Cycling does not damage men's sexual or urinary functions
New polygenic hazard score predicts when men develop prostate cancer
Do less harm: E-cigarettes a safer option than smoking, experts say
Scientists make cells that enable the sense of touch
Surprise: A virus-like protein is important for cognition and memory
Students more engaged and attentive following outdoor lesson in nature
Stem cell-rich cord blood donations could increase by 'nudging' parents, study suggests
New biomarkers for colorectal cancer
Pregnant women in NC exposed to less secondhand nicotine after ‘smoking ban’
Benefits of a healthy diet greater in people at high genetic risk for obesity
Are there signs of CTE in the brain tissue of younger people with epilepsy?


New model for uncovering true HIV mortality rates in Zambia



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 12:12 PM PST


A new study that seeks to better ascertain HIV mortality rates in Zambia could provide a model for improved national and regional surveillance approaches, and ultimately, more effective HIV treatment strategies.


Past exposures shape immune response in pediatric acute respiratory infections



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 12:12 PM PST


By analyzing immune cells of children who came to the emergency department with flu symptoms, researchers found that the suite of genes these early-response cells expressed was shaped by factors such as age and previous exposures to viruses. Better understanding how early infections influence long-term immune response has implications for the diagnosis and treatment of young patients who suffer from acute respiratory tract infections.


New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 10:29 AM PST


Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world -- creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines -- and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant to many antifungals, meaning once a person is infected, there are limited treatment options. But researchers have now confirmed a new drug compound kills drug-resistant C. auris, both in the laboratory and in a mouse model that mimics human infection.


Scarring molecule in fat tissue links obesity with distressed fat



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 10:29 AM PST


The fat of obese people becomes distressed, scarred and inflamed, which can make weight loss more difficult.


Localized cooling of the heart limits damage caused by a heart attack



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 10:29 AM PST


Researchers have succeeded in the localized cooling of the heart during a heart attack, a world first. By cooling part of the heart prior to and following angioplasty, the cardiologists believe that the damage from a heart attack can be limited.


Scleroderma study: Hope for a longer life for patients with rare autoimmune disorder



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 10:29 AM PST


The approach could represent the first new treatment to improve survival in patients with severe scleroderma in more than four decades.


New warning system discovered in the immune defense



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 10:29 AM PST


Researchers have discovered a previously unknown warning system that contributes to the body's immune system. Mitochondria in the white blood cells secrete a web of DNA fibers that raises the alarm. The results may lead to increased knowledge about autoinflammatory diseases and cancer.


The combination of two proteins exerts a regenerating effect in Parkinson's disease



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 10:29 AM PST


Current therapies for Parkinson's disease are mainly of a replacement type and pose problems in the long term, so the challenge is to establish an early diagnosis and develop neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies that will allow the symptoms of the disease to be slowed down or even reversed. Researcher have now documented the regenerative, neuroprotective effect of two neurotrophic factors when they are applied in a combined way.


Does an exploding brain network cause chronic pain?



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 10:29 AM PST


New research reports that hyperreactive brain networks could play a part in the hypersensitivity of fibromyalgia.


New method to map miniature brain circuits



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 10:29 AM PST


In a feat of nanoengineering, scientists have developed a new technique to map electrical circuits in the brain far more comprehensively than ever before. Scientists worldwide could use the technique to uncover the architecture of different parts of the brain.


Can Muesli help against arthritis?



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 10:27 AM PST


It is well known that healthy eating increases our general sense of wellbeing. Researchers have now discovered that a fiber-rich diet can have a positive influence on chronic inflammatory joint diseases, leading to stronger bones.


Genetic analysis can improve depression therapy



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 07:51 AM PST


The failure of SSRI antidepressants can be a result of genetic variations in patients. Variations within the gene that encodes the CYP2C19 enzyme results in extreme differences in the levels of escitalopram achieved in patients, according to a new study. Prescribing the dose of escitalopram based on a patient's specific genetic constitution would greatly improve therapeutic outcomes.


New technology will create brain wiring diagrams



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 06:59 AM PST


Scientists have developed new technology that allows them to see which neurons are talking to which other neurons in live fruit flies.


Newborn immune activation may have long-term negative impact on brain function



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 06:59 AM PST


Neuroscientists have found that even a brief episode of immune system activation within days of birth can cause persistent changes in sleep patterns concurrent with increases in epilepsy-like brain activity -- a combination of symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions.


Glucose-induced nerve damage: Research identifies underlying mechanisms



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 06:12 AM PST


New research has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy also plays a role in peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. The significance of the identification of a common molecular mechanism is that the drug candidates she identified to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy could potentially be used to treat peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes as well.


Asthma costs the US economy more than $80 billion per year



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 06:12 AM PST


Asthma costs the US economy more than $80 billion annually in medical expenses, missed work and school days and deaths, according to new research.


Anxiety: An early indicator of Alzheimer's disease?



Posted: 12 Jan 2018 06:12 AM PST


A new study suggests an association between elevated amyloid beta levels and the worsening of anxiety symptoms. The findings support the hypothesis that neuropsychiatric symptoms could represent the early manifestation of Alzheimer's disease in older adults.


Can writing your 'to-do's' help you to doze? Study suggests jotting down tasks can



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 07:40 PM PST


Writing a 'to-do' list at bedtime may aid in falling asleep, according to a new study. Research compared sleep patterns of participants who took five minutes to write down upcoming duties versus participants who chronicled completed activities.


Experts raise concerns over raw meat diets for cats and dogs



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 07:40 PM PST


Experts are warning dog and cat owners to be aware of the risks associated with feeding their pets raw meat-based diets, instead of the more conventional dry or canned pet foods.


Emotionally demanding workload and confrontational patients key stressors for GPs



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 07:40 PM PST


The emotional impact of their daily workload and confrontational patients are among the key stressors for family doctors in England, reveals an analysis of feedback from general practitioners.


Risk of non-infectious elephantiasis mapped in Cameroon



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 11:17 AM PST


Both the etiology and demographics of podoconiosis, a non-infectious disease which causes massive swelling of the legs, are poorly understood. To help contribute to the global atlas of podoconiosis knowledge, researchers have now described the distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon.


Human protein may aid neuron invasion by virus that causes hand, foot, and mouth disease



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 11:17 AM PST


A human protein known as prohibitin may play a significant role in infection of the nervous system by EV71, one of several viruses that can cause hand, foot, and mouth disease.


Different strains of same bacteria trigger widely varying immune responses



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 11:17 AM PST


Genetic differences between different strains of the same pathogenic bacterial species appear to result in widely varying immune system responses, according to new research.


Re-programming innate immune cells to fight tuberculosis



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 11:16 AM PST


Tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which attacks the lungs, claims someone's life every 20 seconds and 1.5 million lives worldwide every year. A cure has eluded scientists for more than a century but, now, researchers may have discovered a new weapon to combat this global killer. The team is re-programing - or 'training' - immune cells to kill TB.


Cycling does not damage men's sexual or urinary functions



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 11:16 AM PST


Cycling is increasingly popular for transportation, exercise, and leisure, and its impact on sexual health has received a great deal of media attention, especially regarding erectile function. Researchers have now found that contrary to some previous studies, neither recreational nor intense cycling appear to have a negative impact on men's sexual and urinary function.


New polygenic hazard score predicts when men develop prostate cancer



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 11:16 AM PST


Medical researchers have developed and validated a genetic tool for predicting age of onset of aggressive prostate cancer, a disease that kills more than 26,000 American men annually.


Do less harm: E-cigarettes a safer option than smoking, experts say



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 11:16 AM PST


A new article focuses on harm minimization and smoking cessation, with alternative nicotine products like e-cigarettes emerging as a promising avenue for people who want to quit smoking.


Scientists make cells that enable the sense of touch



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 11:15 AM PST


Researchers have, for the first time, coaxed human stem cells to become sensory interneurons -- the cells that give us our sense of touch. The new protocol could be a step toward stem cell-based therapies to restore sensation in paralyzed people who have lost feeling in parts of their body.


Surprise: A virus-like protein is important for cognition and memory



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 11:14 AM PST


A protein pivotal to how the brain acquires knowledge originated from a chance evolutionary event that occurred hundreds of millions of years ago. The protein, called Arc, is involved in storing long-term memories and learning. But new research shows that Arc looks and acts like a protein from viruses.


Students more engaged and attentive following outdoor lesson in nature



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 08:53 AM PST


A study has found that children are significantly more attentive and engaged with their schoolwork following an outdoor lesson in nature. Teachers could teach uninterrupted for almost twice as long during a subsequent indoor lesson. Outdoor lessons may be an inexpensive and convenient way to improve student engagement.


Stem cell-rich cord blood donations could increase by 'nudging' parents, study suggests



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 08:53 AM PST


A two-year study of expectant mothers in Milan, Italy, has found that cord blood donations increased significantly when parents received information about the procedure and 'prompts' to indicate their interest in donating at both early and late stages of their pregnancies.


New biomarkers for colorectal cancer



Posted: 11 Jan 2018 07:14 AM PST


Researchers have found a new biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC) that might improve therapy and survival rates of patients. Biomarkers are measurable biological indicators for a specific disease, such as changes in the amounts of certain proteins that occur in combination with certain illnesses. Such biomarkers help physicians to diagnose a condition, identify the disease stage, and determine a patient's risk for recurrence of the disease. This supports the doctor in choosing the best-fitting treatment plan.


Pregnant women in NC exposed to less secondhand nicotine after ‘smoking ban’



Posted: 10 Jan 2018 07:35 PM PST


A new study has found pregnant women experienced less secondhand smoke exposure since the 2009 passage of the ‘smoking ban’ in North Carolina, which outlawed smoking inside public places such as bars and restaurants.


Benefits of a healthy diet greater in people at high genetic risk for obesity



Posted: 10 Jan 2018 07:05 PM PST


The benefits of sticking to a healthy diet to prevent long term weight gain are greater in people at high genetic risk for obesity than in those with low genetic risk, finds a new study.


Are there signs of CTE in the brain tissue of younger people with epilepsy?



Posted: 10 Jan 2018 01:35 PM PST


Younger adults with difficult-to-treat epilepsy may have early signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in their brain tissue, but it appears to be uncommon, according to a small, preliminary study.
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