ScienceDaily: Top Technology News

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ScienceDaily: Top Technology News


Three gallons of radioactive tank waste vitrified last month
Bitcoin estimated to use half a percent of the world's electric energy by end of 2018
Evidence for stars forming just 250 million years after Big Bang
Quarks feel the pressure in the proton
An electronic rescue dog
Researchers control the properties of graphene transistors using pressure
Glass-forming ability: Fundamental understanding leading to smart design
Diagnosing breast cancer with an imaging pill
Wearable technology and AI to predict the onset of health problems
New research could improve efficiency and luminance of TV and smartphone displays
New device could increase battery life of electronics by a hundred-fold
Astronomers find fastest-growing black hole known in space
Unusual laser emission from the Ant Nebula
A quantum entanglement between two physically separated ultra-cold atomic clouds
Plug-and-play diagnostic devices
Tailor-made synthesis of cyclic chemicals by means of enzymes
Artificial Intelligence improves stroke and dementia diagnosis in most common brain scan
How electronic health records can benefit clinical trials
Researchers take key step toward growing human organs in laboratory
World's Strongest bio-material outperforms steel and spider silk
Processes in the atomic microcosmos are revealed
Self-driving car has taken a leap towards automatic 24/7 driving
Method to overcome false positives in CT imaging for lung cancer
Quantum-enhanced sensors for real-life applications
Accumulating over time, even low concentrations of silver can foil wastewater treatment
Enzyme's movement may be key to new cancer drugs
Your body is transparentized in a virtual environment
Biologists identify temporal logic of regulatory genes affecting nitrogen use efficiency in plants


Three gallons of radioactive tank waste vitrified last month



Posted: 16 May 2018 02:23 PM PDT


Approximately three gallons of low-activity Hanford tank waste were vitrified at PNNL's Radiochemical Processing Laboratory in April. The laboratory-scale demonstration is an important step toward the eventual treatment of millions of gallons of hazardous waste generated during past plutonium production at Hanford.


Bitcoin estimated to use half a percent of the world's electric energy by end of 2018



Posted: 16 May 2018 10:12 AM PDT


Bitcoin's burgeoning electricity demands have attracted almost as much attention as the cryptocurrency's fluctuating value. But estimating exactly how much electricity the Bitcoin network uses remains a challenge. A new methodology helps pinpoint where Bitcoin's electric energy consumption is headed and how soon it might get there.


Evidence for stars forming just 250 million years after Big Bang



Posted: 16 May 2018 10:12 AM PDT


Astronomers have used observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) to determine that star formation in the very distant galaxy MACS1149-JD1 started at an unexpectedly early stage, only 250 million years after the Big Bang. This discovery also represents the most distant oxygen ever detected in the universe and the most distant galaxy ever observed by ALMA or the VLT.


Quarks feel the pressure in the proton



Posted: 16 May 2018 10:12 AM PDT


Inside every proton in every atom in the universe is a pressure cooker environment that surpasses the atom-crushing heart of a neutron star. That's according to the first measurement of a mechanical property of subatomic particles, the pressure distribution inside the proton.


An electronic rescue dog



Posted: 16 May 2018 10:11 AM PDT


Scientists have developed the smallest and cheapest ever equipment for detecting people by smell. It could be used in the search for people buried by an earthquake or avalanche.


Researchers control the properties of graphene transistors using pressure



Posted: 16 May 2018 10:11 AM PDT


Researchers have developed a technique to manipulate the electrical conductivity of graphene with compression, bringing the material one step closer to being a viable semiconductor for use in today's electronic devices.


Glass-forming ability: Fundamental understanding leading to smart design



Posted: 16 May 2018 09:37 AM PDT


Researchers studied the glass-forming ability of two simple systems, establishing the 'thermodynamic interface penalty,' which is an indicator of the extent of the structural difference between a crystal and its melt. The fundamental understanding acquired is expected to lead to physics-driven design of glassy materials, allowing for better control and tailoring, and aiding advances in the manufacture of numerous materials including metallic alloys.


Diagnosing breast cancer with an imaging pill



Posted: 16 May 2018 09:37 AM PDT


For women, mammograms are a sometimes uncomfortable, but necessary, annual ritual. But this procedure doesn't always provide accurate results, and it exposes women to X-rays. In a new study, scientists report that they have developed a non-invasive 'disease screening pill' that can make cancerous tumors light up when exposed to near-infrared light in mice without using radiation.


Wearable technology and AI to predict the onset of health problems



Posted: 16 May 2018 09:37 AM PDT


Researchers found that applying artificial intelligence to the right combination of data retrieved from wearable technology may detect whether your health is failing. The study found that the data from wearable sensors and artificial intelligence that assesses changes in aerobic responses could one day predict whether a person is experiencing the onset of a respiratory or cardiovascular disease.


New research could improve efficiency and luminance of TV and smartphone displays



Posted: 16 May 2018 09:36 AM PDT


Your TV and smartphone could be more efficient and luminescent thanks to new research.


New device could increase battery life of electronics by a hundred-fold



Posted: 16 May 2018 09:36 AM PDT


Among the chief complaints for smartphone, laptop and other battery-operated electronics users is that the battery life is too short and -- in some cases -- that the devices generate heat. Now, a group of physicists has developed a device material that can address both issues. The team has applied for a patent for a magnetic material that employs a unique structure -- a 'honeycomb' lattice that exhibits distinctive electronic properties.


Astronomers find fastest-growing black hole known in space



Posted: 16 May 2018 07:52 AM PDT


Astronomers have found the fastest-growing black hole known in the universe, describing it as a monster that devours a mass equivalent to our sun every two days.


Unusual laser emission from the Ant Nebula



Posted: 16 May 2018 07:23 AM PDT


Astronomers have discovered an unusual laser emission that suggests the presence of a double star system hidden at the heart of the 'spectacular' Ant Nebula. The extremely rare phenomenon is connected to the death of a star and was discovered in observations made by European Space Agency's Herschel space observatory.


A quantum entanglement between two physically separated ultra-cold atomic clouds



Posted: 16 May 2018 07:23 AM PDT


Scientists have achieved, in an experiment, quantum entanglement between two ultra-cold atomic ensembles, called Bose-Einstein condensates, spatially separated from each other.


Plug-and-play diagnostic devices



Posted: 16 May 2018 07:23 AM PDT


Researchers have developed modular blocks that can be put together in different ways to produce diagnostic devices. These 'plug-and-play' devices can test blood glucose levels in diabetic patients or detect viral infection, among other functions.


Tailor-made synthesis of cyclic chemicals by means of enzymes



Posted: 16 May 2018 07:14 AM PDT


Penicillin-based antibiotics contain a five-membered hydrocarbon cycle, additionally incorporating a sulfur and a nitrogen atom. Researchers have now succeeded in selectively synthesizing this important substructure with different residues on this cycle using a biotechnological method.


Artificial Intelligence improves stroke and dementia diagnosis in most common brain scan



Posted: 16 May 2018 07:14 AM PDT


Artificial Intelligence improves stroke and dementia diagnosis in commonest form of brain scan.


How electronic health records can benefit clinical trials



Posted: 16 May 2018 07:14 AM PDT


A new study has indicated that the Secure Anonymized Information Linkage (SAIL) Databank can provide a simple, cost-effective way to follow-up after the completion of randomized controlled trials.


Researchers take key step toward growing human organs in laboratory



Posted: 16 May 2018 07:14 AM PDT


Researchers have learned that precursor cells for skeletal muscles actually also give rise to neurons, blood vessels, blood cells and immune cells, pushing science one step closer to generating body parts in a laboratory.


World's Strongest bio-material outperforms steel and spider silk



Posted: 16 May 2018 07:14 AM PDT


At DESY's X-ray light source PETRA III, researchers have produced the strongest bio-material that has ever been made. The artificial, but biodegradable cellulose fibers are stronger than steel and even than dragline spider silk, which is usually considered the strongest bio-based material.


Processes in the atomic microcosmos are revealed



Posted: 16 May 2018 05:56 AM PDT


Physicists have successfully generated controlled electron pulses in the attosecond range. They used optical travelling waves that are formed by laser pulses of varying wavelengths. The movements of electrons in atoms were revealed using attosecond free-electron pulses.


Self-driving car has taken a leap towards automatic 24/7 driving



Posted: 15 May 2018 03:09 PM PDT


VTT's robot car, Marilyn, sees better than humans in foggy, and even snowy, conditions, and can now navigate without stopping -- including in bad weather. It can also see a human through fog and avoid accident automatically.


Method to overcome false positives in CT imaging for lung cancer



Posted: 15 May 2018 01:28 PM PDT


A team of researchers has identified a technology to address the problem of false positives in CT-based lung cancer screening.


Quantum-enhanced sensors for real-life applications



Posted: 15 May 2018 06:29 AM PDT


Quantum-enhanced sensors could find their way into applications ranging from biomedical to chemical detection. In a new study, researchers demonstrate the ability of quantum states of light to enhance the sensitivities of state-of-the-art plasmonic sensors. The team presents the first implementation of a sensor with sensitivities considered state-of-the-art and shows how quantum-enhanced sensing can find its way into real-life applications.


Accumulating over time, even low concentrations of silver can foil wastewater treatment



Posted: 15 May 2018 06:29 AM PDT


Research has shed new light how an increasingly common consumer product component -- silver nanoparticles -- can potentially interfere with the treatment of wastewater.


Enzyme's movement may be key to new cancer drugs



Posted: 15 May 2018 06:29 AM PDT


Motion is crucial for proper functioning of a kinase enzyme, scientists have found. Not only must the kinase have all needed parts in place, the enzyme must move in the correct manner and at the correct speed to function properly in a cell. Focusing on ways to impede the enzyme's motion may be an avenue for developing new drugs to combat cancer and other diseases.


Your body is transparentized in a virtual environment



Posted: 15 May 2018 05:17 AM PDT


Researchers have found that visual-motor synchronicity of only the hands and feet can induce a sense of illusory ownership over an invisible body interpolated between virtual hands and feet. This active method to induce a sense of illusory ownership over an invisible body at a distance has potential applications in skill learning/transfer and the concept of body-appearance-irrelevant communication in the future.


Biologists identify temporal logic of regulatory genes affecting nitrogen use efficiency in plants



Posted: 14 May 2018 12:19 PM PDT


A team of biologists and computer scientists has adopted a time-based machine-learning approach to deduce the temporal logic of nitrogen signaling in plants from genome-wide expression data.
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