ScienceDaily: Top Technology News

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ScienceDaily: Top Technology News


Opening communication lines between propulsion and airflow poses new questions
Novel topological insulator
Light switch: Scientists develop method to control nanoscale manipulation in high-powered microscopes
The culprit of superconductivity in cuprates
Versatile molecular system extends the promise of light-activated switches
Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments
Innovative sensing technique could improve greenhouse gas analysis
A break from the buzz: Bees go silent during total solar eclipse
Engineers develop process to 3-D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons
Nail polishes with 'n-free' labels are not necessarily free of toxic compounds
Synergy in two-dimensional materials, membranes research clear in professor's new work
Supercomputer predicts optical properties of complex hybrid materials
Artificial intelligence helps reveal how people process abstract thought
Newly discovered bacterium rids problematic pair of toxic groundwater contaminants


Opening communication lines between propulsion and airflow poses new questions



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 10:34 AM PDT


On the runway to more fuel-efficient aircraft, one alternative propulsion scheme being explored is an array of electrically powered ducted fans. The fans are distributed across the wing span or integrated into the wing. Researchers have gained new understanding in how the fans and especially their precise placement on the aircraft can affect the cross-conversation between propulsion and the airflow around the wing.


Novel topological insulator



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 08:24 AM PDT


For the first time, physicists have built a unique topological insulator in which optical and electronic excitations hybridize and flow together.


Light switch: Scientists develop method to control nanoscale manipulation in high-powered microscopes



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 08:24 AM PDT


Researchers from Japan have taken a step toward faster and more advanced electronics by developing a way to better measure and manipulate conductive materials through scanning tunneling microscopy.


The culprit of superconductivity in cuprates



Posted: 11 Oct 2018 06:05 AM PDT


Researchers have uncovered an underlying mechanism related to the materials dependence in copper-based high-temperature superconductors. The research may open a new avenue for designing materials with high-temperature superconductivity.


Versatile molecular system extends the promise of light-activated switches



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 10:24 AM PDT


A newly-developed molecule is easy to make, simple to work with and may potentially be used for the development of targeted medications and high-density memory devices with the volume of a speck of a dust.


Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 09:49 AM PDT


For all the good they do, eye drops and ointments have one major drawback: It's hard to tell how much of the medication is actually getting to the eye. Now scientists report that they have developed a contact lens that changes color as drugs are released. This visual indicator could help eye doctors and patients readily determine whether these medications are where they should be. 


Innovative sensing technique could improve greenhouse gas analysis



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 08:19 AM PDT


An international team of researchers has used an unconventional imaging technique known as ghost imaging to make spectroscopic measurements of a gas molecule.


A break from the buzz: Bees go silent during total solar eclipse



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:55 AM PDT


In an unprecedented study of a solar eclipse's influence on bee behavior, researchers organized citizen scientists and elementary school classrooms to set up acoustic monitoring stations to listen in on bees' buzzing -- or lack thereof -- as the August 2017 total solar eclipse passed over North America. The results were clear and consistent at locations across the United States: Bees stopped flying during the period of total solar eclipse.


Engineers develop process to 3-D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 07:55 AM PDT


Scientists have developed a method to 3-D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons to greatly improve a patient's recovery. A person with a badly damaged ligament, tendon, or ruptured disc could simply have new replacement tissue printed and ultimately implanted in the damaged area.


Nail polishes with 'n-free' labels are not necessarily free of toxic compounds



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 06:36 AM PDT


Consumers are growing more knowledgeable about the potential health effects of nail polish, and manufacturers have taken action. They have started removing potentially toxic ingredients and labeling their products as being free of those substances. However, these labels aren't always accurate, and reformulated products aren't necessarily safer, according to a new report.


Synergy in two-dimensional materials, membranes research clear in professor's new work



Posted: 10 Oct 2018 06:36 AM PDT


Two-dimensional materials and membranes were once separate fields, but synergistic opportunities are resulting in exciting new developments at their intersection.


Supercomputer predicts optical properties of complex hybrid materials



Posted: 09 Oct 2018 08:50 AM PDT


Computational models of layered hybrid perovskites open new material design space for light-based applications such as LEDs and water purification.


Artificial intelligence helps reveal how people process abstract thought



Posted: 09 Oct 2018 08:50 AM PDT


As artificial intelligence becomes more sophisticated, much of the public attention has focused on how successfully these technologies can compete against humans at chess and other strategy games. A philosopher has taken a different approach, deconstructing the complex neural networks used in machine learning to shed light on how humans process abstract learning.


Newly discovered bacterium rids problematic pair of toxic groundwater contaminants



Posted: 09 Oct 2018 08:50 AM PDT


Researchers have detailed the discovery of the first bacterium known capable of simultaneously degrading the pair of chemical contaminants -- 1,4-Dioxane and 1,1-DCE.
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