Welcome to Herointown, New Jersey's 4th Largest City

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December 15, 2015


WELCOME TO HEROINTOWN, NEW JERSEY'S 4TH LARGEST CITY

Steve Stirling of NJ.com launched this project last year with the goal of exploring New Jersey's heroin epidemic from a different perspective – one that went beyond expert voices and the heroin dens in New Jersey's cities. After receiving more than 500 responses from residents and developing 18 separate estimates of the possible heroin user population spanning an entire decade, he landed on a conservative estimate of New Jersey's heroin abuse population: 128,000. This number – and so much more – is presented today for the first time anywhere.
MUSLIMS IN NORTH JERSEY REMAIN ON GUARD
In the wake of the attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, along with several acts of violence against Muslims in the US, many in New Jersey's Muslim communities have adopted a new normal. The Record says although no acts of hatred have been recorded here, Muslims are changing their habits and remain on guard against threats of violence against themselves and their families. 
MORE CLAIMS BY 2ND AMENDMENT SOCIETY OVER PERMIT DENIALS BY POLICE
Members of the Second Amendment Society say they've had to resort to taking secret recordings of several police departments after being repeatedly told that they had to meet additional requirements that are not included in New Jersey law in order to obtain a concealed carry permit. NJTV says it's rare for police to issue carry permits in New Jersey, but gun advocates say the refusal to comment by Edison and other police departments speaks volumes about the right to bear arms in NJ.
FORMER KEAN UNIVERSITY STUDENT PLEADS NOT GUILTY TO THREATS AGAINST FELLOW BLACK STUDENTS
The Kean University student accused of making fake threats against fellow black students at a November rally on racial issues has pleaded not guilty. The Record says Kayla-Simon McKelvey of Union Township faces one count of creating a false public alarm, and could face up to five years in prison if she is found guilty and receives the maximum penalty. Her attorney cautioned Monday that even a probationary term could include roughly one year in jail. 
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: We've extended the deadline for submissions to our statewide undergraduate reporting contest, which boasts a grand price of $650. We will now be accepting submissions until April 1, 2016. The best submissions will be included and published as part of our Dirty Little Secrets project with the Center for Investigative Reporting.
Want more? Check out our must-reads here.

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